narrative

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nar·ra·tive

 (năr′ə-tĭv)
n.
1. A narrated account; a story.
2. The art, technique, or process of narrating: the highest form of narrative.
3.
a. A presentation of real-world events that connects them in a storylike way: "There has been less of a coherent, connected media narrative and more of a kind of episodic focus on events, controversies and gaffes" (Mark Jurkowitz).
b. An explanation or interpretation of events in accordance with a particular theory, ideology, or point of view: the competing narratives of capitalism and Marxism.
adj.
1. Consisting of or characterized by the telling of a story: narrative poetry.
2. Of or relating to narration: narrative skill.

nar′ra·tive·ly adv.

narrative

(ˈnærətɪv)
n
1. an account, report, or story, as of events, experiences, etc
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the narrative the part of a literary work that relates events
3. the process or technique of narrating
adj
4. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) telling a story: a narrative poem.
5. of or relating to narration: narrative art.
ˈnarratively adv

nar•ra•tive

(ˈnær ə tɪv)

n.
1. a story or account of events, experiences, or the like, whether true or fictitious.
2. the art, technique, or process of narrating.
adj.
3. consisting of or being a narrative: narrative poetry.
4. of or pertaining to narration.
5. representing stories or events pictorially or sculpturally: narrative painting.
[1555–65; < Latin]
nar′ra•tive•ly, adv.

narrative

  • narratage - The technique of having one character in the role of storyteller or the act of inserting bits of explanation into a narrative.
  • narrative - First an adjective meaning "telling the facts of a story," from Latin narrare, which is also the base of narrate.
  • saga - Old Norse for "narrative."
  • diegesis - The narrative or plot.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.narrative - a message that tells the particulars of an act or occurrence or course of eventsnarrative - a message that tells the particulars of an act or occurrence or course of events; presented in writing or drama or cinema or as a radio or television program; "his narrative was interesting"; "Disney's stories entertain adults as well as children"
tearjerker - an excessively sentimental narrative
subject matter, content, message, substance - what a communication that is about something is about
tall tale - an improbable (unusual or incredible or fanciful) story
folk tale, folktale - a tale circulated by word of mouth among the common folk
sob story, sob stuff - a sentimental story (or drama) of personal distress; designed to arouse sympathy
fairy story, fairy tale, fairytale - a story about fairies; told to amuse children
nursery rhyme - a tale in rhymed verse for children
Adj.1.narrative - consisting of or characterized by the telling of a storynarrative - consisting of or characterized by the telling of a story; "narrative poetry"
communicatory, communicative - able or tending to communicate; "was a communicative person and quickly told all she knew"- W.M.Thackeray

narrative

noun story, report, history, detail, account, statement, tale, chronicle, recital He began his narrative with the day of the murder.

narrative

noun
Translations
رِوائي، قَصَصي
historkanaracenarativnípříběhvyprávěcí
fortælling
jutustus
kertomus
saga, frásögn
物語
breedsprakigspraakzaamverhaalverhalendverslag

narrative

[ˈnærətɪv]
A. ADJnarrativo
B. N (= act) → narración f; (= story) → narración f, relato m

narrative

[ˈnærətɪv]
nrécit m
adj [style, poem] → narratif/ive

narrative

n
(= story)Erzählung f; (= account)Schilderung f; (= text)Text m
(= act of narrating)Erzählen nt; (of events, journey)Schilderung f; he has a gift for narrativeer ist ein talentierter Erzähler
adjerzählend; ability etcerzählerisch; narrative poemBallade f; (modern) → Erzählgedicht nt; narrative structureErzählstruktur f

narrative

[ˈnærətɪv]
1. adjnarrativo/a
2. nnarrazione f; (technique) → narrativa

narrate

(nəˈreit) verb
to tell (a story). He narrated the events of the afternoon.
narˈration noun
narrative (ˈnarətiv) noun
a story. an exciting narrative.
narˈrator noun
1. a person who tells a story.
2. a person who tells you what is happening or explains something in a film.
References in classic literature ?
In very many published narratives no little degree of attention is bestowed upon dates; but as the author lost all knowledge of the days of the week, during the occurrence of the scenes herein related, he hopes that the reader will charitably pass over his shortcomings in this particular.
If he closely imitates the narratives which he has before rendered successful, he is doomed to ``wonder that they please no more.
But in Epic poetry, owing to the narrative form, many events simultaneously transacted can be presented; and these, if relevant to the subject, add mass and dignity to the poem.
The most thoroughgoing of all distinctions in literature, as in the other Fine Arts, is that between (1) Substance, the essential content and meaning of the work, and (2) Form, the manner in which it is expressed (including narrative structure, external style, in poetry verse-form, and many related matters).
Round the central figure in the narrative other characters will be found grouped, in sharp contrast -- contrast, for the most part, in which I have endeavored to make the element of humor mainly predominant.
In the month of August, 1841, I attended an anti- slavery convention in Nantucket, at which it was my happiness to become acquainted with FREDERICK DOUGLASS, the writer of the following Narrative.
As little can I believe the narrative of his insolence to Apollo, where he says,
As I said when I began my narrative, when that history comes to be written, this occurrence will surely stand out among all other events like a mountain towering among its foothills.
THE NARRATIVE OF HESTER PINHORN, COOK IN THE SERVICE OF COUNT FOSCO
I request them to suspend their decision until they have read my narrative.
So, if we proceed with our narrative of the chair, I shall still confine myself to its connection with public events.
Of course, no personal tale is complete without bringing the narrative of the person down to the last moment.