narwhal

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nar·whal

also nar·wal  (när′wəl) or nar·whale (-wāl′, -hwāl′)
n.
An Arctic whale (Monodon monoceros) having mottled gray or whitish skin and in the male, a long spirally twisted tusk projecting forward from the left side of the head.

[Norwegian or Danish narhval, from Old Norse nāhvalr : nār, corpse (from its whitish color) + hvalr, whale.]

narwhal

(ˈnɑːwəl) or

narwal

;

narwhale

(ˈnɑːˌweɪl)
n
(Animals) an arctic toothed whale, Monodon monoceros, having a black-spotted whitish skin and, in the male, a long spiral tusk: family Monodontidae
[C17: of Scandinavian origin; compare Danish, Norwegian narhval, from Old Norse nāhvalr, from nār corpse + hvalr whale, from its white colour, supposed to resemble a human corpse]

nar•whal

or nar•wal

(ˈnɑr wəl)

also nar•whale

(-ˌʰweɪl, -ˌweɪl)

n.
a small arctic whale, Monodon monoceros, the male of which has a long, spirally twisted tusk extending forward from the upper jaw.
[1650–60; < Scandinavian; compare Norwegian, Swedish, Dan nar(h)val, reshaped from Old Norse nāhvalr=nār corpse + hvalr whale1]
nar•whal′i•an (-ˈʰweɪ li ən, -ˈweɪ-, -ˈwɒl i-) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.narwhal - small Arctic whale the male having a long spiral ivory tusknarwhal - small Arctic whale the male having a long spiral ivory tusk
whale - any of the larger cetacean mammals having a streamlined body and breathing through a blowhole on the head
genus Monodon, Monodon - type genus of the Monodontidae
Translations
一角

narwhal

[ˈnɑːwəl] Nnarval m

narwhal

nNarwal m

narwhal

[ˈnɑːwl] nnarvalo
References in classic literature ?
Built by a retired admiral in the early years of the nineteenth century, the curving bow windows of the front, now filled with reddish-yellow light, suggested a portly three-decker, sailing seas where those dolphins and narwhals who disport themselves upon the edges of old maps were scattered with an impartial hand.
If, on the contrary, we DO know all living kinds, we must necessarily seek for the animal in question amongst those marine beings already classed; and, in that case, I should be disposed to admit the existence of a gigantic narwhal.
The common narwhal, or unicorn of the sea, often attains a length of sixty feet.
Indeed, the narwhal is armed with a sort of ivory sword, a halberd, according to the expression of certain naturalists.
The United States were the first in the field; and in New York they made preparations for an expedition destined to pursue this narwhal.
And--I think I may say I have the finest collection of narwhal tusks in the world.
Kadlu traded the rich, creamy, twisted narwhal horn and musk-ox teeth (these are just as valuable as pearls) to the Southern Inuit, and they, in turn, traded with the whalers and the missionary-posts of Exeter and Cumberland Sounds; and so the chain went on, till a kettle picked up by a ship's cook in the Bhendy Bazaar might end its days over a blubber-lamp somewhere on the cool side of the Arctic Circle.
Even so, they might have managed to scrape through the winter on their stock of frozen salmon and stored blubber, and what the traps gave them, but in December one of their hunters came across a tupik(a skin-tent) of three women and a girl nearly dead, whose men had come down from the far North and been crushed in their little skin hunting-boats while they were out after the long- horned narwhal.
That was the last he saw of the man in the red sweater, and as Curly and he looked at receding Seattle from the deck of the Narwhal, it was the last he saw of the warm Southland.
In the 'tween-decks of the Narwhal, Buck and Curly joined two other dogs.
Dave" he was called, and he ate and slept, or yawned between times, and took interest in nothing, not even when the Narwhal crossed Queen Charlotte Sound and rolled and pitched and bucked like a thing possessed.
At last, one morning, the propeller was quiet, and the Narwhal was pervaded with an atmosphere of excitement.