Native American


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Native American

n.
A member of any of the indigenous peoples of the Western Hemisphere. The ancestors of the Native Americans are generally considered by scientists to have entered the Americas from Asia by way of the Bering Strait sometime during the late glacial epoch.

Native American adj.
Usage Note: Native American is now fully established in American English as an equivalent of Indian, being acceptable in all contemporary contexts and preferred in many. It is especially appropriate as a term of respect used by outsiders, who may have concerns that Indian could cause offense by its association with longstanding cultural stereotypes. Native American is the clear choice in many formal contexts, not only because it indicates respect but, more pragmatically, because it avoids any ambiguity between indigenous American peoples and the inhabitants of India. But despite its wide acceptance, Native American has not displaced Indian to any significant degree outside of formal contexts, and it is now common to find the two terms used interchangeably in the same piece of writing. Furthermore, the issue of which term to use has never been particularly divisive between Indians and non-Indians. While generally welcoming the respectful tone of Native American, most Indian writers have continued to use Indian at least as often. · Native American and Indian are not exact equivalents when referring to the indigenous peoples of Canada and Alaska. Native American, the broader term, is properly used of all such peoples, whereas Indian is customarily used of the northern Athabaskan and Algonquian peoples in contrast to the Inuit and the Yupik. Alaska Native (or less commonly Native Alaskan) is also properly used of all indigenous peoples residing in Alaska. See Usage Notes at American Indian, First Nation, Indian.

Native American

n
(Peoples) A member of the indigenous peoples of North America
adj
(Peoples) of, relating to, or characteristic of Native Americans or any of their languages

Amer′ican In′dian


n.
a member of any of the indigenous peoples of North and South America, usu. excluding the Aleuts and Eskimos.
[1725–35]
usage: See Indian.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Native American - any member of the peoples living in North or South America before the Europeans arrivedNative American - any member of the peoples living in North or South America before the Europeans arrived
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
war party - a band of warriors who raid or fight an enemy (used especially of Native Americans)
person of color, person of colour - (formal) any non-European non-white person
American Indian, Indian, Red Indian - a member of the race of people living in America when Europeans arrived
South American Indian - a member of a native Indian group in South America
Carib, Carib Indian - a member of an American Indian peoples of northeastern South America and the Lesser Antilles
Arawak, Arawakan - a member of a widespread group of Amerindians living in northeastern South America
Adj.1.Native American - of or pertaining to American Indians or their culture or languagesNative American - of or pertaining to American Indians or their culture or languages; "Native American religions"; "Indian arrowheads"
Translations
أحد الهنود الحُمْر، هندي أمريكي
rodilý Američan
indianer
amerikai indián
rodený Američan
ameriški Indijanec
Amerikan yerli halkıKızılderili

Native American

[ˌneɪtɪvəˈmerɪkən]
A. ADJamericano nativo
B. Namericano/a m/f nativo/a

Native American

adjindianisch
nIndianer(in) m(f)

native

(ˈneitiv) adjective
1. where one was born. my native land.
2. belonging to that place; local. the native customs/art of Brazil; This animal/plant is native to Australia.
3. belonging by race to a country. a native Englishman.
4. belonging to a person naturally. native intelligence.
noun
1. a person born in a certain place. a native of Scotland; a native of London.
2. one of the original inhabitants of a country eg before the arrival of explorers, immigrants etc. Columbus thought the natives of America were Indians.
Native ˈAmerican noun
American Indian.
native ˈlanguage/ˈtongue noun
My native language is Spanish, but I also speak English and German.
native speaker
a person who has spoken a particular language ever since he was able to speak at all. I am a native speaker of English; a native Spanish speaker.
native to
(of plants and animals) belonging originally to a particular place. These birds are native to Australia.
the Nativity (nəˈtivəti)
the birth of Christ.
References in classic literature ?
The same, I say, because in all these cases the native American liberally provides the brains, the rest of the world as generously supplying the muscles.
And as the plants and animals migrated southward, they will have become mingled in the one great region with the native American productions, and have had to compete with them; and in the other great region, with those of the Old World.
Oral Native American Traditions: The Antecedents of Contemporary Native American Theater
Baird Callicott, argue that while the typical world of Native American peoples has supported an environmental ethic, this ethic should not be confused with an ecological perspective.
A lack of social justice has been at the center of Native American-European American relationships since expansionism and domination of the Native American began with the first war waged against the Pequot tribe in 1637.
Swisher (1991) explains that research suggests that traditional classroom environments often interfere with the way Native American children learn.
My friend explained that high-profile individualism is rare in Native American culture because of a strong emphasis on community.
For so long, it has been a history of their family that has been overlooked and denied," says Heape, who also produced How to Trace Your Native American Heritage (Rich-Heape Films, 1997).
In any event, the Fancy Shawl dancers have found a way to push the envelope regarding expectations of Native American women.
Kegler of Emory University have compared antismoking socialization beliefs among rural white and Native American parents.
Curcio-Nagy provides wonderful details of these spectacles: the Native Americans dressed "as ancient warriors" who "positioned their canoes along the cause-ways and bowed in deference to the new governor;" Afro-Mexican women dancing in accompaniment to a presentation of paintings portraying the viceroy as a phoenix rising to rule over them; a triumphal arch constructed by the silversmiths' guild covered in 102 silver panels illuminated by 400 votive candles placed on 40 chandeliers.
Mann also explores the question of Native American ancestry and growing doubts that the first Americans migrated to the new world strictly across the Bering Strait.

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