natterjack

(redirected from Natterjack Toad)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

natterjack

(ˈnætəˌdʒæk)
n
(Animals) a European toad, Bufo calamita, of sandy regions, having a greyish-brown body marked with reddish warty processes: family Bufonidae
[C18: of unknown origin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.natterjack - common brownish-yellow short-legged toad of western Europenatterjack - common brownish-yellow short-legged toad of western Europe; runs rather than hops
true toad - tailless amphibian similar to a frog but more terrestrial and having drier warty skin
References in periodicals archive ?
This unusual and historic natural make-up of the Sefton coast provides the perfect home to a variety of creatures, including the Northern Dune Tiger Beetle, the Natterjack Toad and of course, the adorable red squirrel.
FLINTSHIRE Countryside Service recently teamed up with Network Rail to carry out important environmental work - helping the rare natterjack toad.
Tenders are invited for dahg are now seeking tenders for the delivery of a monitoring programme of natterjack toad (epidalea (bufo) calamita) populations in co.
Dooks emblem is a natterjack toad, as the course is home to a thriving colony, and to encourage the survival of this rare species two ponds have been built within the course.
The examination of species in this country suggests that birds including the cuckoo and turtle dove, as well as creatures such as the natterjack toad and brown hare, are also among those most at risk of disappearing in the next 40 years.
This Tuesday's edition sees him travel to Castlegregory in Co Kerry to tune into the fascinating world of the natterjack toad.
I remember my pleasure in seeing a natterjack toad, which is now an endangered species.
The Herpetological Conservation Trust will receive pounds 92,000 to help conservation of the natterjack toad in Cumbria, where around half of England's populations exist in increasingly isolated pockets along the coast.
Back on dry land, Solway Coast AONB manager Brian Irving and his team are working hard to protect another struggling local species: the natterjack toad, a rare amphibian that lives in sand dunes and salt marshes.
Examples of such species include the Lesser Horseshoe bat, Rhinolophus hipposideros, the Natterjack toad, Bufo calamita, and cetacean species (sea mammals like dolphins and whales).
Banks & Beebee (1987) found the endangered Natterjack toad (Bufo calamita) sought ponds with particular physical and chemical properties that included steepness of the pond bank and pH.