natural law

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natural law

n.
A body of principles that are considered to be inherent in nature and have universal application in determining whether human conduct is right or wrong, often contrasted with positive law.

natural law

n
1. (Philosophy) an ethical belief or system of beliefs supposed to be inherent in human nature and discoverable by reason rather than revelation
2. (Philosophy) a nonlogically necessary truth; law of nature. See also nomological2
3. (Philosophy) the philosophical doctrine that the authority of the legal system or of certain laws derives from their justifiability by reason, and indeed that a legal system which cannot be so justified has no authority

nat′ural law′


n.
a principle or body of laws considered as derived from nature, right reason, or religion and as ethically binding in human society.
[1350–1400]

natural law

The body of law that is believed to be inherent in human nature.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.natural law - a rule or body of rules of conduct inherent in human nature and essential to or binding upon human society
concept, conception, construct - an abstract or general idea inferred or derived from specific instances
divine law - a law that is believed to come directly from God
principle - a basic truth or law or assumption; "the principles of democracy"
sound law - a law describing sound changes in the history of a language
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Van Dun's statement of the core of natural law theory comports with other statements.
Once the slogan of unjust laws not being laws has been tamed, we discover a lot of agreement between legal scholars, and not just natural lawyers, but positivists like Hart, and even realists like Posner, about data that seems relevant to the support of a modest natural law theory.
The question of whether or to what extent seventeenth-century theories of natural law, beginning with Grotius, constitute an intellectual revolution and the inauguration of a "modern" natural law theory is an ongoing debate.
Response to Robert Koons and Matthew O'Brien's "Objects of Intention: A Hylomorphic Critique of the New Natural Law Theory," CHRISTOPHER TOLLEFSEN
Inagaki later researched Thomas' conception of natural law theory as well as the constitution of Japan.
distinguish legal positivism from natural law theory.
I develop and defend an Aristotelian-Thomistic approach to natural rights in general and property rights in particular in "Classical Natural Law Theory, Property Rights, and Taxation," Social Philosophy and Policy 27, no.
3) In short, Zagorin's book is a helpful introduction into the basics of Hobbesian politics, the prominent secondary debates, and the broader historical context of natural law theory, which will inspire many of its readers with a positive awareness of the potentially moral dimensions in Hobbes' political writings.
Sorkin helpfully draws out the links between natural law theory in Gallicanism and in German Protestantism and the efforts of Eybel under Maria Theresa and Joseph II.
In particular, the new natural law theory, of which John Finnis is the foremost champion, seeks to avoid the epistemological pitfalls in which the scholastic version of natural law theory had previously become entangled.
Ministers of the law; a natural law theory of legal authority.
We can read discussions on whether Kantian disinterest is the appropriate mode of apprehension for football; on whether the position of the referee in football is best theorized by natural law theory, by Hobbesian or Rawlsian contractarianism, by John Austin's theory of laws as commands of the sovereign, Hart's theory of laws as social rules, or Holmes's legal realism (all this in four pages, which gives some idea of the depth and sophistication of the analysis).