natural law

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natural law

n.
A body of moral and ethical principles that are considered to be inherent in nature itself or deducible through reason alone, often contrasted with positive law.

natural law

n
1. (Philosophy) an ethical belief or system of beliefs supposed to be inherent in human nature and discoverable by reason rather than revelation
2. (Philosophy) a nonlogically necessary truth; law of nature. See also nomological2
3. (Philosophy) the philosophical doctrine that the authority of the legal system or of certain laws derives from their justifiability by reason, and indeed that a legal system which cannot be so justified has no authority

nat′ural law′


n.
a principle or body of laws considered as derived from nature, right reason, or religion and as ethically binding in human society.
[1350–1400]

natural law

The body of law that is believed to be inherent in human nature.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.natural law - a rule or body of rules of conduct inherent in human nature and essential to or binding upon human society
concept, conception, construct - an abstract or general idea inferred or derived from specific instances
divine law - a law that is believed to come directly from God
principle - a basic truth or law or assumption; "the principles of democracy"
sound law - a law describing sound changes in the history of a language
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
In the second and final part of the book, Bushlack places his account of civic virtue in dialogue with natural law theory (chapter 4) and contemporary political philosophy (chapter 5), and concludes the book with a discussion of the role of rhetoric in promoting the common good (chapter 6).
Christian Wolff's natural law theory was founded on his rationalist philosophy and metaphysics, which were strongly influenced by the philosophy of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz.
That liberalism, he thinks, can best be explained not by turning to the writings of the founders or of John Locke but rather to the new natural law theory of the contemporary Australian moral philosopher John Finnis.
Smith's aversion to standing with Natural Law theory on this issue, though, is in tension with other claims that she makes.
Hart's legal positivism, Hans Kelsen's pure theory of law, John Finnis' natural law theory, Lon Fuller's theory, and Ronald Dworkin's interpretive approach); themes and principles of justice, punishment, rights and rights talk, will and reason, authority, finality, mistake, common law reasoning and precedent, statutory interpretation and legislative intentions, legal enforcement of morality, and the obligation to obey the law; and modern perspectives on legal theory, including American legal realism, economic analysis of law, critical perspectives, law and literature, the philosophical foundations of the common law, and other approaches, such as pragmatism and postmodernism.
Van Dun's statement of the core of natural law theory comports with other statements.
ordering is chronological as well as thematic: natural law theory began
12) Natural law theory also 'is unhelpful to the scientific understanding of the way laws emerge and change over time.
The question of whether or to what extent seventeenth-century theories of natural law, beginning with Grotius, constitute an intellectual revolution and the inauguration of a "modern" natural law theory is an ongoing debate.
Inagaki later researched Thomas' conception of natural law theory as well as the constitution of Japan.
Here, Ophuls uses classical and more contemporary literature to explore the essence of the problem, outlining and justifying the need for a new public philosophy, based on a natural law theory of politics that draws upon knowledge from the disciplines of ecology, physics and psychology.
Zagorin's work summarizes the history of natural law theory up to Hobbes's day, explains how Hobbes appropriated this tradition, and then establishes "the considerable originality and large significance of Hobbes as a humane moral philosopher and theorist of natural law" (x).