human rights

(redirected from Natural Rights theory)
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human rights

pl.n.
The basic rights and freedoms to which all humans are considered to be entitled, often held to include the rights to life, liberty, equality, and a fair trial, freedom from slavery and torture, and freedom of thought and expression.

human rights

pl n
(Sociology) the rights of individuals to liberty, justice, etc

hu′man rights′


n.pl.
fundamental rights, esp. those believed to belong to an individual and in whose exercise a government may not interfere, as the rights to speak, associate, and work.
[1785–95]
Translations
drets humans
lidská práva
menneskerettighedermenneskerettighederne
ihmisoikeudet
droits de l'hommedroits de l’homme
זכויות האדם
ljudska prava
emberi jogok
hak asasi manusia
mannréttindi
人権
인권
mensenrechtenrechten van de mens
ľudské práva
mänskliga rättigheter
สิทธิของมนุษย์
права людини
nhân quyền

human rights

npldiritti mpl dell'uomo

human rights

حُقُوقُ الإِنْسَانُ lidská práva menneskerettigheder Menschenrechte ανθρώπινα δικαιώματα derechos humanos ihmisoikeudet droits de l'Homme ljudska prava diritti umani 人権 인권 mensenrechten menneskerettigheter prawa człowieka direitos humanos права человека mänskliga rättigheter สิทธิของมนุษย์ insan hakları nhân quyền 人权
References in periodicals archive ?
To put things bluntly: Natural rights theory is wrong, useless, and unnecessary.
As can be seen, the bumps and efficiency of natural rights theory as one of the basic principles of human rights, it stipulates the rules and principles so will engulfed state government can not neglect them raped if this happens, the base can resist such a state as to prevent abuses and violations of natural principles.
For lawyers and judges seeking to resolve groundwater/takings controversies, one potential source of guidance is a natural rights theory of property.
Natural rights theory had not been absent from that literature, but it had never been more than complimentary to their principal argument, which rested on law.
Surprisingly enough, the upshot of Edelstein's account of the "natural republicanism" is thus to demonstrate its isolation from both of the vanguard currents of political thought in the eighteenth century, natural rights theory and republicanism, classical or otherwise.
The natural rights theory is inextricably linked to arguments about the sanctity, uniqueness, and originality of authorial work, the notion of Romantic authorship and copyright ownership.
However, he applies the theory only to communities within a state, relies on natural rights theory, and is committed to proving the optimality of the minimal state.
The natural rights theory outlined here is based on an ethical view in terms of which the morally good human life consists of a person living rationally.
Langan proceeds to outline the theistic presuppositions of the Declaration, comparing it with contemporary readings of Locke's deistic natural rights theory and William Connolly's revived "immanent naturalism.
Stated simply, the significance of the shift from the necessary evil to the positive good argument cannot be adequately understood unless put in terms of a regression from modern natural rights theory to classic natural right theory.
In drawing attention to the absence from Barnett's book of an extended exploration and defense of the content of his natural rights theory, I do not intend to criticize him.
This is without question an original perspective and Hess makes the most of it, but what suffers is his interpretation of the first part of Jerusalem, where Mendelssohn uses natural rights theory to advocate the separation of state and church, which solely guarantees freedom of religion.

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