Navarre


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Related to Navarre: Henry of Navarre

Na·varre

 (nə-vär′, nä-)
A historical region and former kingdom of southwest Europe in the Pyrenees of northern Spain and southwest France. Inhabited from early times by ancestors of the Basques, it was ruled by a Basque dynasty from the 9th to the 13th century. The southern part was annexed to Spain (1512-1515), while the northern part remained an independent kingdom until it was incorporated into the French crown lands in 1589.

Navarre

(nəˈvɑː)
n
(Placename) a former kingdom of SW Europe: established in the 9th century by the Basques; the parts south of the Pyrenees joined Spain in 1515 and the N parts passed to France in 1589. Capital: Pamplona. Spanish name: Navarra

Na•varre

(nəˈvɑr)

n.
a former kingdom in SW France and N Spain. Spanish, Na•var•ra (nɑˈvɑr rɑ)
Na•var′ri•an, adj.
Translations
Navarra

Navarre

[nəˈvɑːʳ] NNavarra f
References in classic literature ?
Ladies answered back with historiettes that would almost have made Queen Margaret of Navarre or even the great Elizabeth of England hide behind a handkerchief, but nobody hid here, but only laughed -- howled, you may say.
Nothing to do but hitch your rope ladder to the battlements, shin down it, break your leg in the moat -- because a rope ladder is nineteen foot too short, you know -- and there's your horses and your trusty vassles, and they scoop you up and fling you across a saddle, and away you go to your native Langudoc, or Navarre, or wherever it is.
I asked her whether, like Marguerite de Navarre, she had their hearts embalmed and hung at her girdle.
It is not enough that I have compelled all the knights of Navarre, all the Leonese, all the Tartesians, all the Castilians, and finally all the knights of La Mancha, to confess thee the most beautiful in the world?
Thus she presented to the eyes of the world a union of all Christian virtues; and du Bousquier was certainly one of the luckiest men in the kingdom of France and of Navarre.
sire, I have performed it for thirty years, and in all France and Navarre there is not a man in better health than I am.
Blunt, the dear handsome man, has arrived from Navarre three days ago or more.
In the forefront gleamed, like the white plumes of Navarre, the light flannel suit of Arthur Mifflin, the woodenest juvenile in captivity.
You know, Master Cheneteau, the Hôtel de Navarre, which belonged to Monsieur de Nemours?
The Percerin of that period was a Huguenot, like Ambrose Pare, and had been spared by the Queen of Navarre, the beautiful Margot, as they used to write and say, too, in those days; because, in sooth, he was the only one who could make for her those wonderful riding-habits which she so loved to wear, seeing that they were marvelously well suited to hide certain anatomical defects, which the Queen of Navarre used very studiously to conceal.
For example, that Henry of Navarre, when a Protestant baby, little thought of being a Catholic monarch; or that Alfred the Great, when he measured his laborious nights with burning candles, had no idea of future gentlemen measuring their idle days with watches.
I have been hunting for it ever since the accession of His Majesty to the thrones of France and of Navarre.