Necker cube


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Necker cube

(ˈnɛkə)
n
a line drawing showing the 12 edges of a transparent cube, so that it can be seen alternately facing in two different directions: an example of an ambiguous figure
[C19: named after Louis Albert Necker (1786–1861), Swiss mineralogist]
References in periodicals archive ?
In Phenomenology of Perception (1962), Merleau-Ponty made use of a well-known visual paradox of modern psychology: the Necker cube (fig.
Turning now to Figure 1b, inspection readily discloses that both of the perspectives shown in Figure 1a are encompassed in the body of the Necker cube.
The voluntary shift of perspective in seeing the Necker cube this way or that exemplifies the top-down control exercised by a human being on the basis of the role of language and meaning in their activity.
What is behind each photograph is a) physical reality, in the form of architecture and b) the "material" (in this case, digital) process, and also, crucially, c) the human intervention of selection, finely tuned to a surprisingly broad range of easily recognizable artistic or pseudoartistic lineages--from tropes of abstract painting and photography to a Blair Witch project-style basement or the corner of a Necker cube.
The central motif, also a necker cube, resembled the image of the Kab'ba, a sacred site for Muslims.
The test that can best assess the distractibility associated with DA following an MBI is called the Necker Cube Pattern Control Test.
The Necker Cube itself (Fig 1) is 2 cm horizontally and vertically and 1 cm diagonally.
The Necker cube is slightly different from my goose-shaped ashtray in that I can, almost at will, "flip" the cube and see it the other way.
This lesson is useful enough when looking at Necker cubes and op art, but it becomes crucial when we observe the social world around us.
The Necker cube is interesting to psychologists because it will flip spontaneously between the two views if you keep looking at it.
After observing how quickly the Necker cube nips state and knowing how slow the underlying human computing elements are, it seems unlikely that a sequential program on such a slow device could do the job.
A classic example is the Necker Cube, shown in Fig.