needlestick

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needlestick

(ˈniːdəlˌstɪk)
adj
(Medicine) (of an injury) caused by accidentally pricking the skin with a hypodermic needle
Translations

needlestick

n pinchazo de aguja; — injury lesión f por pinchazo (de aguja)
References in periodicals archive ?
The first worker was flown back to England for monitoring after suffering a needle-stick injury in Sierra Leone.
According to a recent survey, 99% of all surgeons have admitted experiencing needle-stick injuries during his or her lifetime.
Radiometer's safePICO70 arterial blood gas syringes enable safe and simple, single-handed removal of needles, helping to eliminate needle-stick injuries.
The Nanopatch also offers a way to stop needle-stick injuries during vaccination which again is a particularly important problem in Africa; with a third of vaccines affected by other complications brought about through cross contamination needle stick injury," he added.
During the late-1980s, however, another consideration was added to the anatomical consideration, namely the possibility of being infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as a result of an accidental needle-stick injury.
Medical interns who work long shifts and late at night are at increased risk for needle-stick injuries, according to a study in the Sept.
In the same issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Nemes and colleagues report a separate case of nosocomial dengue also transmitted by needle-stick (2).
For the first time, the government is specifying the types of devices that should be used to reduce the risk of needle-stick injuries.
The Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act, overseen by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, requires employers, including office-based physicians with at least 11 employees, to discuss safer devices with staff members who deliver patient care and potentially would be exposed to needle-stick injuries.
An estimated 20,000 needle-stick injuries occur annually in the state, with as many as 1,000 people becoming infected with hepatitis C and HIV, among other diseases, because of them.
Of the seven police officers who acquired AIDS occupationally between 1981 and 1991, three absorbed infected blood through cuts, wounds, or scrapes on the skin; two from needle-stick injuries; one from a blood transfusion; and one in undescribed circumstances.
syringes, scalpels) every year; with as many as five million needle-stick injuries gone unreported.