Negro

(redirected from Negroes)
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Ne·gro

 (nē′grō)
n. pl. Ne·groes Often Offensive
1. A black person.
2. A member of the Negroid race. Not in scientific use.

[Spanish and Portuguese negro, black, black person, from Latin niger, nigr-, black; see nekw-t- in Indo-European roots.]

Ne′gro adj.

Negro

(ˈniːɡrəʊ)
n, pl -groes
(Peoples) a member of any of the dark-skinned indigenous peoples of Africa and their descendants elsewhere
adj
(Peoples) relating to or characteristic of Negroes
[C16: from Spanish or Portuguese: black, from Latin niger black]
ˈNegroˌism n

Negro

(ˈneɪɡrəʊ; ˈnɛɡ-)
n
1. (Placename) a river in NW South America, rising in E Colombia (as the Guainía) and flowing east, then south as part of the border between Colombia and Venezuela, entering Brazil and continuing southeast to join the Amazon at Manáus. Length: about 2250 km (1400 miles)
2. (Placename) a river in S central Argentina, formed by the confluence of the Neuquén and Limay Rivers and flowing east and southeast to the Atlantic. Length: about 1014 km (630 miles)
3. (Placename) a river in central Uruguay, rising in S Brazil and flowing southwest into the Uruguay River. Length: about 467 km (290 miles)

Ne•gro1

(ˈni groʊ)

n., pl. -groes,
adj. Older Use: Sometimes Offensive. n.
1. a member of any of the indigenous peoples of sub-Saharan Africa, or one of their descendants.
adj.
2. of or designating Negroes.
[1545–55; < Sp and Portuguese negro black < Latin nigrum, masculine acc. of niger black]
usage: See black.

Ne•gro2

(ˈneɪ groʊ; Sp. ˈnɛ grɔ)
; Port. ne′gro͝o),
n.
1. a river in NW South America, flowing SE from Colombia into the Amazon. 1400 mi. (2255 km) long.
2. a river in S Argentina, flowing E from the Andes to the Atlantic. 700 mi. (1125 km) long.
3. a river in SE South America, flowing SW from Brazil into the Uruguay River. ab. 500 mi. (800 km) long.
Portuguese, Rio Negro. Spanish, Río Negro.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Negro - a person with dark skin who comes from Africa (or whose ancestors came from Africa)Negro - a person with dark skin who comes from Africa (or whose ancestors came from Africa)
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
Africa - the second largest continent; located to the south of Europe and bordered to the west by the South Atlantic and to the east by the Indian Ocean
person of color, person of colour - (formal) any non-European non-white person
Negress - a Black woman or girl
Black race, Negro race, Negroid race - a dark-skinned race
Black man - a man who is Black
Black woman - a woman who is Black
colored, colored person - a United States term for Blacks that is now considered offensive
darkey, darkie, darky - (ethnic slur) offensive term for Black people
jigaboo, nigga, nigger, nigra, coon, spade - (ethnic slur) extremely offensive name for a Black person; "only a Black can call another Black a nigga"
Tom, Uncle Tom - (ethnic slur) offensive and derogatory name for a Black man who is abjectly servile and deferential to Whites
picaninny, piccaninny, pickaninny - (ethnic slur) offensive term for a Black child
archaicism, archaism - the use of an archaic expression
Adj.1.negro - relating to or characteristic of or being a member of the traditional racial division of mankind having brown to black pigmentation and tightly curled hair
black - of or belonging to a racial group having dark skin especially of sub-Saharan African origin; "a great people--a black people--...injected new meaning and dignity into the veins of civilization"- Martin Luther King Jr.
Translations
زِنْجي، رَجُل أسْوَد
černoch
neger
néger
svertingi
negras
nēģeris

Negro

[ˈniːgrəʊ] (pej in US)
A. ADJnegro
B. N (Negroes (pl)) → negro m
C. Negro spiritual Nespiritual m

Negro

[ˈniːgrəʊ] [Negroes] (pl) (old-fashioned)
adj
(gen)noir(e)
[music, arts] → nègre, noir(e)
nNoir(e) m/f

Negro

(neg!)
adjNeger- (neg!); Negro slaveNegersklave m/-sklavin f
nSchwarze(r) m, → Neger m (neg!)

Negro

[ˈniːgrəʊ] (offensive)
1. adjnegro/a
2. n (-es (pl)) → negro/a

Negro

(ˈniːgrəu) feminine ˈNegress: plural ˈNegroes noun
a name for a person belonging to or descended from the black-skinned race from the area of Africa south of the Sahara.
References in classic literature ?
Cash for negroes,' 'cash for negroes,' 'cash for negroes,' is the heading of advertisements in great capitals down the long columns of the crowded journals.
I should say, perhaps, in explanation of this latter piece of description, that among the other blessings which public opinion secures to the negroes, is the common practice of violently punching out their teeth.
Washington arose and asked them to sing one after another of the old melodies that I had heard all my life; but I had never before heard them sung by a thousand voices nor by the voices of educated Negroes.
But to teach the Negro to do skilful work, as men of all the races that have risen have worked,--responsible work, which IS education and character; and most of all when Negroes so teach Negroes to do this that they will teach others with a missionary zeal that puts all ordinary philanthropic efforts to shame,--this is to change the whole economic basis of life and the whole character of a people.
Two or three decades ago social philosophers and statisticians and well-meaning philanthropists were still talking and writing about the deportation of the Negroes, or about their settlement within some restricted area, or about their settling in all parts of the Union, or about their decline through their neglect of their children, or about their rapid multiplication till they should expel the whites from the South--of every sort of nonsense under heaven.
My design in this was to make the river Gambia or Senegal, that is to say anywhere about the Cape de Verde, where I was in hopes to meet with some European ship; and if I did not, I knew not what course I had to take, but to seek for the islands, or perish there among the negroes.
The man that had the lance or dart did not fly from them, but the rest did; however, as the two creatures ran directly into the water, they did not offer to fall upon any of the negroes, but plunged themselves into the sea, and swam about, as if they had come for their diversion; at last one of them began to come nearer our boat than at first I expected; but I lay ready for him, for I had loaded my gun with all possible expedition, and bade Xury load both the others.
I found him by his blood staining the water; and by the help of a rope, which I slung round him, and gave the negroes to haul, they dragged him on shore, and found that it was a most curious leopard, spotted, and fine to an admirable degree; and the negroes held up their hands with admiration, to think what it was I had killed him with.
Negroes, therefore, must have been known in England in the dark ages.
The fields about it were overgrown with brambles, the fences gone, even the few negro quarters, and out-houses generally, fallen partly into ruin by neglect and pillage; for the negroes and poor whites of the vicinity found in the building and fences an abundant supply of fuel, of which they availed themselves without hesitation, openly and by daylight.
They left everything--household goods, clothing, provisions, the horses in the stable, the cows in the field, the negroes in the quarters--all as it stood; nothing was missing-- except a man, a woman, three girls, a boy and a babe
I accordingly went over to the plantation, and re-instituted my inquiries among the older negroes of the place.