Negrophobia


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Ne·gro·pho·bi·a

 (nē′grə-fō′bē-ə)
n.
1. Fear of or contempt for black people and their culture.
2. Behavior based on such an attitude or feeling.

Ne′gro·phobe′ n.
Ne′gro·pho′bic adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
Progressivism and Negrophobia became the way of the new Southern era.
The answer is muddled by centuries of negrophobia and anti-Haitianism in the Dominican Republic; beginning with colonization; early border disputes; occupation in the nineteenth century; and Rafael Trujillo's thirty-one-year reign (1930-1961).
Contrasting anti-Semitism with Negrophobia, Frantz Fanon asserts that the "Jewishness of the Jew" can "go unnoticed.
Negrophobia and reasonable racism: The hidden cost of being black in America.
Anti-Semitism as well as negrophobia (23) is running amuck in American Society.
Roosevelt, implacable opposition to New Deal reforms, desire to banish or destroy the United Nations, anti-Semitism, Negrophobia, isolationism.
The aforementioned images of African Americans have contributed to what Armour (1997) calls Negrophobia, or an irrational fear of African Americans.
2) Alternatively, Tapia's play is a project designed to bring about colonial reform by mollifying Negrophobia, which is accomplished in part by displacing it with Judeophobia.
104) Garveyism struck a chord with African Canadians because they, like other blacks in the United States, Caribbean, and England, faced xenophobia and negrophobia during the interwar years; African Canadians thus shaped the UNIA into "the chief instrument of protest" for racial uplift activists in Canada.
2008) 'Brutal inheritances: echoes, negrophobia and masculinist violence' in S.
The racializing gaze of negrophobia does not simply objectify him.
avert the pitfalls of investigating Dominican attitudes about race exclusively through the words of the scribes of the ruling class; despite their negrophobia from colonial times to the present, it is inevitable to find the omnipresence of black contribution to Dominican culture" ("Tribulations" 1088).