neo-Darwinism


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Ne·o-Dar·win·ism

 (nē′ō-där′wə-nĭz′əm)
n.
Darwinism as modified by the findings of modern genetics.

Ne′o-Dar·win′i·an (-där-wĭn′ē-ən) adj.
Ne′o-Dar′win·ist n.

Neo-Darwinism

(ˌniːəʊˈdɑːwɪnˌɪzəm)
n
(Biology) the modern version of the Darwinian theory of evolution, which incorporates the principles of genetics to explain how inheritable variations can arise by mutation
ˌNeo-Darˈwinian adj, n

ne•o-Dar•win•ism

(ˌni oʊˈdɑr wɪˌnɪz əm)

n.
a modification of Darwin's theory of evolution holding that species evolve by natural selection acting on genetic variation.
[1900–05]
ne`o-Dar′win•ist, n.

Neo-Darwinism

the theory that maintains natural selection to be the major factor in plant and animal evolution and denies the possibility of inheriting acquired characteristics. — Neo-Darwinist, n., adj. — Neo-Darwinian, n., adj.
See also: Evolution
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.neo-Darwinism - a modern Darwinian theory that explains new species in terms of genetic mutations
Darwinism - a theory of organic evolution claiming that new species arise and are perpetuated by natural selection
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References in periodicals archive ?
It makes the case for a posthumanist ethics that draws on work done in coevolutionary neo-Darwinism, biocentric ethics, animal umwelt phenomenology, and non-anthropocentric animal ethics.
In recent years, however, traditional Darwinism 6 and later revised accounts of neo-Darwinism 6 have themselves come under increasingly (https://www.
3) The selfish gene concept, (4) which underlies a great deal of modern neo-Darwinism, has been challenged by the recognition that the complexity of life extends down to the level of the cell and the genome.
The target is neo-Darwinism and the ease with which the overwhelming complexity of actually lived life is squeezed into tubes other creatures need either to develop adaptations or to decompose.
I can't hope to replicate the rigor of her arguments against neo-Darwinism, but I can suggest, with a couple final quotations, what distinguishes her thought.
To Dawkins and likeminded thinkers, everything else--color, sound, free will, consciousness, your distinct sense of self when you see your reflection in the mirror--is bunk, and human beings are nothing more than "molecules in motion," explains Andrew Ferguson, a critic of neo-Darwinism, in The Weekly Standard.
Verschuuren claims to be a staunch defender of neo-Darwinism or synthetic evolutionary theory, the synthesis of Darwinian natural selection and Mendelian genetic inheritance.
The racialism and idea of competition, termed social Darwinism or neo-Darwinism in 1944, were discussed by European scientists and also in the Vienna press during the 1920s.
Drawing strong correlations between the seemingly atypical works, Alfer and Edwards de Campos carefully chart the ways in which these fictions highlight "striking and unexpected similarities between the relatively modern scientific discourse of neo-Darwinism and eco-criticism, and the ancient narrative form of the tale" (132).
A primary assumption of the evolutionary model behind neo-Darwinism is that development can be traced back through a series of subtly incremental changes.
The goal of teaching students about evolution is to secure a better understanding of neo-Darwinism.