neopaganism


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Related to neopaganism: Polyarchy

Ne·o·pa·gan·ism

or Ne·o-Pa·gan·ism  (nē′ō-pā′gə-nĭz′əm)
n.
Any of various religious movements arising chiefly in the United Kingdom and the United States in the late 1900s that combine worship of pagan nature deities, particularly of the earth, with benign witchcraft.

neopaganism

(ˌniːəʊˈpeɪɡənɪzəm)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) theol a revival of paganism, modern paganism

neopaganism

the revival of paganism. — neopagan, adj.neopaganist, n., adj.
See also: Religion
References in periodicals archive ?
Modern paganism, also known as contemporary paganism, and neopaganism, is a group of contemporary religious movements influenced by or claiming to be derived from the various historical pagan beliefs of pre-modern Europe.
Seventeen papers are included, exploring such specific topics as rethinking place and belonging among Angolan Christians in Lisbon, the metamorphoses of neopaganism in traditionally Catholic countries in Southern Europe, pluralizing religiosity in the everyday practice of Greek Orthodoxy, religious belonging and new ways of being Italian in the self-perception of second-generation immigrants in Italy, religious rites and Afro-Brazilian associations in Portugal, mosque controversies and the religious life of Pakistani immigrants in Greece, the multiplicity of religious expressions among Albanian Muslim women in Macedonia, Pentecostalism and ethnic minorities in Barcelona, and religious education as a cultural battlefield in Greece.
Since the industrialization, a secularization process took place and sport was divided from the religion, obtaining the extents of a particular institution, a new form of control (Marcuse), of collective mobilization (Gjata, 2003: 36), of neopaganism, of dictature se based on football, fiesta, fado (Salazar), of modern slavery.
Cooper believes the former prevails consistently from Plato to Whitehead, while the latter can be seen from Schleiermacher to Bergson, Reuther, and the Wiccan neopaganism of Miriam Simos (Starhawk).
Ephraim of Syria with the opponents of his time, especially NeoPaganism under Emperor Julian Apostata.
Russell's textbook on witchcraft, the final chapters of which now seem dated (A History of Witchcraft [London: Thames & Hudson, 1980]), Bailey concludes the book with a recent overview of neopaganism, the Craft, and Wicca.
The religion of the future will be a kind of neopaganism which will consist in the worship of the vital forces of nature in place of spiritual abstractions or a transcendent divinity," he wrote.
It is likelier than not that, given the general openness of Neopaganism to homosexuality, most Neopaganists would publicly support same-sex marriage within their faith traditions.
These topics have been explored in a variety of forums from online communities to multi-dimensional chat rooms and in a variety of religious traditions from the Christian or Islamic context to that of New Religious Movements such as neopaganism.
Though the text focuses especially on the three franchises in the title, Harry Potter, Narnia, and the Lord of the Rings also discusses broader implications of children's fantasy literature in its depictions of the occult, its connections to Wicca and neopaganism, and its usage by corporations to mass-market products and cement a consumerist mentality in young people as early as possible in life.
In the 20th century, in the darkest period of German and European history, an insane racist ideology, born of neopaganism, gave rise to the attempt, planned and systematically carried out by the regime, to exterminate European Jewry," Benedict XVI said.