neopaganism

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Ne·o·pa·gan·ism

or Ne·o-Pa·gan·ism  (nē′ō-pā′gə-nĭz′əm)
n.
Any of various religious movements arising chiefly in the United Kingdom and the United States in the late 1900s that combine worship of pagan nature deities, particularly of the earth, with benign witchcraft.

neopaganism

(ˌniːəʊˈpeɪɡənɪzəm)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) theol a revival of paganism, modern paganism

neopaganism

the revival of paganism. — neopagan, adj.neopaganist, n., adj.
See also: Religion
References in periodicals archive ?
These later works were dismissed by mainstream archaeologists but embraced by some feminists and neopagans.
Not only neopagans like Machiavelli (whose Prince was written at almost the same time as More's Utopia), but a large number of serious Christians, learned and other, wanted to rethink Christianity in a new, less austere, less legalistic, and more aesthetic manner.
Modern pagans, aka neopagans, usually celebrate on April 30 to May 1 in the Northern Hemisphere and on Oct.
It somehow got picked up by neopagans and has become commonplace since the 1991 movie The Doors, in which Jim Morrison gets married in a Celtic pagan ritual.
Because their beliefs are eclectic and seen as heretical by mainstream Christians, Neopagans have often been discriminated against, or misunderstood, which sometimes forces them into what they refer to as the Pagan Broom Closet, an analogy to the gay closet.
I wouldn't call the neopagans a clear and present threat to all that's holy.
These tend toward the English tradition of archeological romanticism, through a feminist postmodern lens; neopagans will feel at home.
It is an area that I am incredibly interested in and I am keen to act as a sort of a bridge between the scientists and their clever but rather dry explanations of bioplasmic auras and morphic resonance fields and the enthusiastic Neopagans who can inadvertently negate such already underestimated phenomena.
One of the most common prejudices connected to Neopagans is that they are Satanists, the embodiment of evil, and they commit a series of crimes, ranging from drug abuse and rape to ritual human sacrifice.
Modern Neopagans list it with the quality of fire, and it is used for power and purification rites.
The history of the city, whether real or imagined, has attracted self-identified Wiccans and neopagans for decades, and so there really is no better place for a 13-year-old dungeon master to get a book on real arcane knowledge.
In this regard they resemble another population of baby-boomers and their children, the Wiccans and Neopagans, who would have made an interesting addition to the book with an essay of their own.