neophobia

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Related to Neophobic: neophobia

neophobia

(ˌniːəʊˈfəʊbɪə)
n
a tendency to dislike anything new; fear of novelty
ˈneoˌphobe n
ˌneoˈphobic adj

neophobia

misoneism.
See also: Change, Novelty
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.neophobia - a morbid fear of novelty
simple phobia - any phobia (other than agoraphobia) associated with relatively simple well-defined stimuli
Translations
NeophobieNovophobie
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, group-living species may be less neophobic and/or more explorative (Greenberg and Mettke-Hofmann, 2001).
In addition to these possible unintended consequences to other animals, poisons can cause rodents suffering; animals may show outward signs of pain and distress and it may take days before the anticoagulant takes full effect; the poisons are designed to be slow-acting because these animals are neophobic - meaning they have a deep fear of new things or changes.
The references are passing, and occasionally appear neophobic in aligning science with the baseness of the modern age, but are balanced with more considered reflections.
Habits of eating a variety of foods acquired before the neophobic phase track further on into childhood, adolescence and early adulthood [8].
Since the study was over a four year period any initial neophobic reaction to new nest boxes on the boar-positive sites would be unlikely to influence the result.
During infancy, children are thought to develop a neophobic (fear of new foods with a reluctance to eat) response (Dovey et al, 2008), which has been described as a 'developmental phase' that may serve a protective function ingrained from when our ancestors foraged for food (Martins, 2002).
Banana-flavored solution was also used to produce stronger neophobic effects that might result in group differences on Day 1 due to the swim experience.
To reduce any neophobic response to the test situation, the light-dark compartments are previously dirty with mice other than those used during the test.
Among the factors that have been studied and identified to influence tourists' perceptions, concerns, and confidence about food safety are culture, religion, sanitation perception, past experience, advice from health specialists and physicians, trust in actors in the food chain and regulators, and the neophobic and neophilic attitudes to food.
Kids, just like adults, have widely varying tastes, but while adults are more likely to try new things it is worth remembering that kids can be neophobic.
It is challenging to own and train a dog who is afraid of everything new he encounters; worse, the neophobic canine is also a strong candidate for developing fear-related aggression.
Studies have shown that children are neophobic (having a distrust of the new), which is why even the most determined parents can often fail at convincing a child to try a new dish.