nephron

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nephron
A. renal vein
B. renal artery
C. blood vessels
D. blood
E. Bowman's capsule
F. glomerulus
G. collecting duct
H. urine
I. loop of Henle

neph·ron

 (nĕf′rŏn)
n.
The functional excretory unit of the vertebrate kidney that regulates the amount of water in the body and filters wastes from the blood to produce urine.

[German, from Greek nephros, kidney.]

nephron

(ˈnɛfrɒn)
n
(Anatomy) any of the minute urine-secreting tubules that form the functional unit of the kidneys

neph•ron

(ˈnɛf rɒn)

n.
the filtering and excretory unit of the kidney, consisting of the glomerulus and convoluted tubule.
[< German Nephron]

neph·ron

(nĕf′rŏn)
One of the units of the kidney that filter waste products from the blood and produce urine.

nephron

The basic filtration unit in a kidney. See glomerulus, tubule.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nephron - any of the small tubules that are the excretory units of the vertebrate kidneynephron - any of the small tubules that are the excretory units of the vertebrate kidney
tubule - a small tube
malpighian body, malpighian corpuscle, renal corpuscle - the capsule that contains Bowman's capsule and a glomerulus at the expanded end of a nephron
kidney - either of two bean-shaped excretory organs that filter wastes (especially urea) from the blood and excrete them and water in urine; "urine passes out of the kidney through ureters to the bladder"
Translations
Nephron

neph·ron

n. nefrona, unidad funcional y anatómica del riñón.
References in periodicals archive ?
After three months, an examination of the tissue revealed that nephrons ( the microscopic structural and functional units of the kidney) had formed.
The new structures contained most of the constituent parts present in human nephrons -- including proximal tubules, distal tubules, Bowman's capsule and Loop of Henle.
The functional nephrons will be based on 100% defined human cell lines and iPSC-derived human cells.
For the first time, researchers discovered that in the nephrons, the functional units of the kidneys, had coated a specialized part of cells called brush borders, which help reabsorb and process proteins.
The growth pattern of the ureteric bud and nephrons was assessed by lectin staining.
This finding is consistent with that of a previous study (20) and seems to be reasonable, because a larger resected volume also results in loss of functioning nephrons due to resection of normal parenchyma.
The loss of a sufficient number of nephrons at any time after this period, leads to irreversible kidney failure, as no further cell repair or regeneration can occur.
The cells go on to form nephrons, the functional units of the kidney, responsible for filtering the blood and excreting urine.
Studies have consistently shown that a high consumption of animal protein can progressively destroy kidney nephrons (microscopic filtering units), leading to the weakening of the kidney's ability to filter toxins from the body.
Reduction of renal mass by 5/6 Nx can effectively decrease the number of nephrons, leading to the elevated filtration and drainage in remnant nephrons and impaired endocrine capability.
Because they are so small and sensitive to damage, the nephrons of the kidney must be very carefully cryopreserved so as to avoid freezing and thawing damage from ice formation.