nephron

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nephron
A. renal vein
B. renal artery
C. blood vessels
D. blood
E. Bowman's capsule
F. glomerulus
G. collecting duct
H. urine
I. loop of Henle

neph·ron

 (nĕf′rŏn)
n.
The functional excretory unit of the vertebrate kidney that regulates the amount of water in the body and filters wastes from the blood to produce urine.

[German, from Greek nephros, kidney.]

nephron

(ˈnɛfrɒn)
n
(Anatomy) any of the minute urine-secreting tubules that form the functional unit of the kidneys

neph•ron

(ˈnɛf rɒn)

n.
the filtering and excretory unit of the kidney, consisting of the glomerulus and convoluted tubule.
[< German Nephron]

neph·ron

(nĕf′rŏn)
One of the units of the kidney that filter waste products from the blood and produce urine.

nephron

The basic filtration unit in a kidney. See glomerulus, tubule.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nephron - any of the small tubules that are the excretory units of the vertebrate kidneynephron - any of the small tubules that are the excretory units of the vertebrate kidney
tubule - a small tube
malpighian body, malpighian corpuscle, renal corpuscle - the capsule that contains Bowman's capsule and a glomerulus at the expanded end of a nephron
kidney - either of two bean-shaped excretory organs that filter wastes (especially urea) from the blood and excrete them and water in urine; "urine passes out of the kidney through ureters to the bladder"
Translations
Nephron

neph·ron

n. nefrona, unidad funcional y anatómica del riñón.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the adults of simple vertebrates (fish, amphibians and reptiles) have the ability to regenerate entire nephrons by a process called nephron neogenesis , this capacity is absent in birds and mammals.
Because they are so small and sensitive to damage, the nephrons of the kidney must be very carefully cryopreserved so as to avoid freezing and thawing damage from ice formation.
Central to the progression of CKD is the gradual and irreversible loss of nephrons, the individual functional units of the kidney.
This functional change may be caused by problems outside the kidney such as low blood volume, cardiac output, or blood pressure, or can be caused by damage to the nephrons themselves resulting from nephrotoxic drugs, reactive oxygen species, inflammatory factors, or other causes.
Since they play such a crucial role, kidneys require constant regeneration of dead nephrons and proper blood circulation to maintain healthy cell growth, due to which, they are susceptible to metastasis and cancerous tumors.
neglecta caused decline in serum creatinine and no damage to the glomeruli as the most important parts of nephrons and protected the kidneys against serious damages.
The lesions were "focal," affecting some nephrons and sparing others, and "segmented," scarring one part of the nephron.
Hyperfiltration in these nephrons results form elevations in the mean glomerular transcapillary hydraulic pressure gradient (AP) and plasma flow rate (Qa).
Although the number of the nephrons reach a normal value after the 32nd week, they are short and functionally immature; the development of renal vessels is not completed and renal blood flow is very low (2).
Figure 2 (p22) shows the sequence of events occurring in the nephrons when the glomerulus suffers injury.
In the genital kidney, the testes communicate with the Wolffian ducts through a set of ducts that are modified nephrons with variable morphologies (for review see Williams et al.