Neptune


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Nep·tune

 (nĕp′to͞on′, -tyo͞on′)
n.
1.
a. Roman Mythology The god of water, later identified with the Greek Poseidon.
b. The sea.
2. The eighth planet from the sun, having a sidereal period of revolution around the sun of 164.8 years at a mean distance of 4.5 billion kilometers (2.8 billion miles), a mean equatorial diameter of 49,528 kilometers (30,775 miles), and a mass 17.25 times that of Earth.

[Latin Neptūnus.]

Nep·tu′ni·an (-to͞o′nē-ən, -tyo͞o′-) adj.

Neptune

(ˈnɛptjuːn)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) the Roman god of the sea. Greek counterpart: Poseidon

Neptune

(ˈnɛptjuːn)
n
(Astronomy) the eighth planet from the sun, having fourteen known satellites, the largest being Triton and Nereid, and a faint planar system of rings or ring fragments. Mean distance from sun: 4497 million km; period of revolution around sun: 164.8 years; period of rotation: 14 to 16 hours; diameter and mass: 4.0 and 17.2 times that of earth respectively

Nep•tune

(ˈnɛp tun, -tyun)

n.
1. the Roman god of the sea, identified with the Greek god Poseidon.
2. the sea or ocean: Neptune's mighty roar.
3. the planet eighth in order from the sun, having an equatorial diameter of 30,200 mi. (48,600 km), a mean distance from the sun of 2794.4 million mi. (4497.1 million km), a period of revolution of 164.81 years, and at least six moons.
Nep•tu′ni•an, adj.

Nep·tune

(nĕp′to͞on′)
The eighth planet from the sun and the fourth largest, with a diameter almost four times that of Earth. Neptune has a very active weather system with extremely long and powerful storms. It is the coldest planet in the solar system, with an average surface temperature of -330°F (-201°C). See Table at solar system. See Note at planet.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Neptune - (Roman mythology) god of the seaNeptune - (Roman mythology) god of the sea; counterpart of Greek Poseidon
Roman mythology - the mythology of the ancient Romans
2.Neptune - a giant planet with a ring of ice particles; the 8th planet from the sun is the most remote of the gas giants; "the existence of Neptune was predicted from perturbations in the orbit of Uranus and it was then identified in 1846"
solar system - the sun with the celestial bodies that revolve around it in its gravitational field
Translations
Neptun
NeptunNeptunusNeptuun
Neptunus
Neptúnus
ネプチューン海王星
넵튠해왕성
Neptunus
Neptūnas
Neptūns
Neptun
Netuno
Neptún
Neptun
NeptunНептун
Neptunus

Neptune

[ˈneptjuːn] NNeptuno m

Neptune

n (Astron, Myth) → Neptun m

Neptune

[ˈnɛptjuːn] n (Myth, Astron) → Nettuno
References in classic literature ?
He first blamed the work of Neptune because he had not made the horns of the bull below his eyes, so he might better see where to strike.
But King Neptune had kept no blind look-out; he had been looking admiringly on the battle from his seat on the topmost crests of wooded Samothrace, whence he could see all Ida, with the city of Priam and the ships of the Achaeans.
Now there is a certain huge cavern in the depths of the sea midway between Tenedos and rocky Imbrus; here Neptune lord of the earthquake stayed his horses, unyoked them, and set before them their ambrosial forage.
Meanwhile earth-encircling Neptune lord of the earthquake cheered on the Argives, for he had come up out of the sea and had assumed the form and voice of Calchas.
Then, as the soaring falcon poises on the wing high above some sheer rock, and presently swoops down to chase some bird over the plain, even so did Neptune lord of the earthquake wing his flight into the air and leave them.
Neptune spoke in the likeness and with the voice of Thoas son of Andraemon who ruled the Aetolians of all Pleuron and high Calydon, and was honoured among his people as though he were a god.
To this Neptune lord of the earthquake made answer, "Idomeneus, may he never return from Troy, but remain here for dogs to batten upon, who is this day wilfully slack in fighting.
But as years went by, there came a time when the gods settled that he should go back to Ithaca; even then, however, when he was among his own people, his troubles were not yet over; nevertheless all the gods had now begun to pity him except Neptune, who still persecuted him without ceasing and would not let him get home.
Now Neptune had gone off to the Ethiopians, who are at the world's end, and lie in two halves, the one looking West and the other East.
Bear in mind, however, that Neptune is still furious with Ulysses for having blinded an eye of Polyphemus king of the Cyclopes.
What would you say, then, if we were talking of going to Neptune, which revolves at a distance of more than two thousand seven hundred and twenty millions of miles from the sun
satellite, while Jupiter, Uranus, Saturn, Neptune have each several, an advantage by no means to be despised.