Nero


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Ne·ro

 (nîr′ō, nē′rō) Full name Nero Claudius Caesar. ad 37-68.
Emperor of Rome (54-68) whose early reign was dominated by his mother, Agrippina the Younger. He had his mother and wife murdered, and he was accused of setting the Great Fire of Rome (64). He committed suicide after being deposed by the Senate.

Ne·ro′ni·an (nĭ-rō′nē-ən) adj.

Nero

(ˈnɪərəʊ)
n
(Biography) full name Nero Claudius Caesar Drusus Germanicus; original name Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus. 37–68 ad, Roman emperor (54–68). He became notorious for his despotism and cruelty, and was alleged to have started the fire (64) that destroyed a large part of Rome

Ne•ro

(ˈnɪər oʊ)

n.
(Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus) ( “Nero Claudius Caesar Drusus Germanicus” ) A.D. 37–68, emperor of Rome 54–68.
Ne•ro•ni•an (nɪˈroʊ ni ən) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Nero - Roman Emperor notorious for his monstrous vice and fantastic luxury (was said to have started a fire that destroyed much of Rome in 64) but the Roman Empire remained prosperous during his rule (37-68)Nero - Roman Emperor notorious for his monstrous vice and fantastic luxury (was said to have started a fire that destroyed much of Rome in 64) but the Roman Empire remained prosperous during his rule (37-68)
Translations
Nero

Nero

[ˈnɪərəʊ] NNerón

Nero

[ˈnɪərəʊ] nNerone m
References in classic literature ?
Hence it comes likewise, that princes many times make themselves desires, and set their hearts upon toys; sometimes upon a building; sometimes upon erecting of an order; sometimes upon the advancing of a person; sometimes upon obtaining excellency in some art, or feat of the hand; as Nero for playing on the harp, Domitian for certainty of the hand with the arrow, Commodus for playing at fence, Caracalla for driving chariots, and the like.
It was evident from the last shout and the gathering storm of excitement that, after all, it was to be a race They were well in sight now; Nero the Second and Iris, racing neck-and-neck, drawing rapidly away from the others.
Thus a Trajan and an Antoninus, a Nero and a Caligula, have all met with the belief of posterity; and no one doubts but that men so very good, and so very bad, were once the masters of mankind.
If you had been an ancient Roman, Julian, I believe you would have pitied Nero himself.
Nero's dinner shall transform Nero into the mildest of men before he has done digesting it, and the morning draught of Alexander the Great shall make Alexander run for his life at the first sight of the enemy the same afternoon.
In ancient times, the ambassadors of Nero reached the ninth degree of latitude, but in eighteen centuries only from five to six degrees, or from three hundred to three hundred and sixty geographical miles, were gained.
Livia Augusta, still alive at the time of the play, and there referred to as 'the great Augusta,' was mother of Tiberius and a Drusus (now dead) by a certain Tiberius Claudius Nero (not the Emperor Nero).
I had read Goldsmith's History of Rome, and had formed my opinion of Nero, Caligula, &c.
We parted in tears and kisses, and I lived for some weeks with that sense of having been a Nero, till two months after I received a much glazed and silvered card to the usual effect.
Art thou come, by chance, cruel basilisk of these mountains, to see if in thy presence blood will flow from the wounds of this wretched being thy cruelty has robbed of life; or is it to exult over the cruel work of thy humours that thou art come; or like another pitiless Nero to look down from that height upon the ruin of his Rome in embers; or in thy arrogance to trample on this ill-fated corpse, as the ungrateful daughter trampled on her father Tarquin's?
Where the huge velarium that Nero had stretched across the Colosseum at Rome, that Titan sail of purple on which was represented the starry sky, and Apollo driving a chariot drawn by white, gilt-reined steeds?
Caligula or Nero, those treasure-seekers, those desirers of the impossible, would have accorded to the poor wretch, in exchange for his wealth, the liberty he so earnestly prayed for.