nerve impulse

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nerve impulse

n.
A wave of physical and chemical excitation along a nerve fiber in response to a stimulus, accompanied by a transient change in electric potential in the membrane of the fiber.

nerve impulse

n
(Physiology) the electrical wave transmitted along a nerve fibre, usually following stimulation of the nerve-cell body. See also action potential

nerve′ im`pulse



n.
a progressive wave of electric and chemical activity along a nerve fiber, stimulating or inhibiting action.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nerve impulse - the electrical discharge that travels along a nerve fiber; "they demonstrated the transmission of impulses from the cortex to the hypothalamus"
electrical discharge - a discharge of electricity
action potential - the local voltage change across the cell wall as a nerve impulse is transmitted
References in periodicals archive ?
Potassium is also needed for muscle contraction, transmission of nerve impulses, and the proper functioning of the body's heart and kidneys, Glorioso said.
The study is thought to be the first to demonstrate a telepathic link based on nerve impulses, allowing one person to guess what is on another's mind.
Paralysis can impact the transmission of nerve impulses that control breathing as a consequence of damage to the spinal cord and phrenic nerves.
Light striking the retina initiates a cascade of chemical and electrical events that ultimately trigger nerve impulses.
One possibility might be that both factors cause constriction of tiny arteries that supply blood to the inner ear and damage cells that convert sound vibrations into nerve impulses.
The resulting damage inhibits nerve impulses, producing symptoms that include difficulty walking, impaired vision, fatigue and pain.
Nerve impulses consist only of waves of transient alteration in electrical potential passing along neurons.
When these taste hairs are stimulated, they send nerve impulses to your brain.
Instead of sending nerve impulses to your brain that allow it to "perceive" the acrid smell of a burning cigarette somewhere in the vicinity, they trigger the flask-shaped neuroendocrine cells to dump hormones that make your airways constrict.
Sensors on his chest pick up the nerve impulses to control movement in his bionic arm and hand.
One possibility: both may constrict tiny arteries that supply blood to the inner ear, damaging cells that convert sound vibrations into nerve impulses.
These free radicals could produce an electrical voltage across the retina, thus controlling the nerve impulses from the eye to the brain, he suggested.