melanin

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mel·a·nin

 (mĕl′ə-nĭn)
n.
Any of a group of naturally occurring dark pigments, especially the pigment found in skin, hair, fur, and feathers.

melanin

(ˈmɛlənɪn)
n
(Biology) any of a group of black or dark brown pigments present in the hair, skin, and eyes of man and animals: produced in excess in certain skin diseases and in melanomas

mel•a•nin

(ˈmɛl ə nɪn)

n.
any of a class of insoluble pigments that are found in all forms of animal life and account for the dark color of skin, hair, fur, scales, and feathers.
[1835–45; < Greek melan-, s. of mélās black + -in1]
mel′a•nin•like`, adj.

mel·a·nin

(mĕl′ə-nĭn)
A dark pigment found in the skin, hair, scales, feathers, and eyes of animals. It provides protection against the sun's rays by absorbing ultraviolet light.

melanin

A dark pigment occurring in skin and hair.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.melanin - insoluble pigments that account for the color of e.g. skin and scales and feathersmelanin - insoluble pigments that account for the color of e.g. skin and scales and feathers
feather, plumage, plume - the light horny waterproof structure forming the external covering of birds
cutis, skin, tegument - a natural protective body covering and site of the sense of touch; "your skin is the largest organ of your body"
animal pigment - pigment occurring in animals
Translations
melaniini

melanin

[ˈmelənɪn] Nmelanina f

melanin

[ˈmɛlənɪn] nmélanine f

mel·a·nin

n. melanina, pigmento oscuro de la piel, el pelo y partes del ojo.

melanin

n melanina
References in periodicals archive ?
The neuromelanin of human substantia nigra and its interaction with metals.
Accumulation of mitochondrial DNA defects, oxidative damage, and aggregation of neuromelanin increases the vulnerability of SN neurons which is amplified by a further insult from alpha-synuclein.
The color of these organs depends on the amount, distribution, and quality of melanin, which occurs in 3 forms: neuromelanin (brown-black), eumelanin (brownblack), and pheomelanin (golden yellow-red) (Figure 5, B through D).
Interestingly enough, this pigment's pathway features mixed-type melanins arising from both dopamine and DOPA, a process that in vertebrates has only been reported for neuromelanin (Galvan et al.
This is the first time that the black pigment neuromelanin has been detected in an organoid model.
The black pigment is neuromelanin, a hallmark of the human midbrain.
Influenza A virus labelling was identified within neuromelanin granules as well as on tissue macrophages in the SNpc [134].
Hwang, "Immobilization stress causes increases in tetrahydrobiopterin, dopamine, and neuromelanin and oxidative damage in the nigrostriatal system," Journal of Neurochemistry, vol.
That is, formational theories maintain that under ordinary circumstances the conscious, psychological part of the African personality is undifferentiated from its biogenetic basis (Azibo, 1990a) which minimally involves the locus coeruleus or black dot (King, 1979, 1990), neuromelanin (Nobles, 1976a), seven biogenetically-based traits (affectsymbolic imagery synthesis, multidimensional-polysense perceptual orientedness, ebonics, rhythmic-fluid physiomotor responsiveness, stylistic expressiveness orientation, affiliative-socializing orientation, and religious orientation) (Baldwin, 1981), and the African collective unconscious (Bynum, 1999; Bynum, et al.
Tyrosinase forms neuromelanin in human brain and causes dopamine neurotoxicity as well as contributes to neurodegeneration associated with Parkinson's disease.
SN has been divided into two macroscopic portions by their neurotransmitters, a dorsal portion rich in neurons containing neuromelanin called zona compacta (SNc) (Parent & Hazrati, 1995).