Nevelson


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Nev·el·son

 (nĕv′əl-sən), Louise 1899-1988.
Russian-born American sculptor whose massive works, often of wood, cast metal, and found objects, are characterized by complex and rhythmic abstract shapes.

Nev•el•son

(ˈnɛv əl sən)

n.
Louise,1900-1988, U.S. sculptor, born in Russia.
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Noun1.Nevelson - United States sculptor (born in Russia) known for massive shapes of painted wood (1899-1988)
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Inspiring, is what I can say about Louise Nevelson.
7) and Louise Nevelson pieces went to Stanford, Moo would come here for a meditative moment 'almost every day--it was especially good in the morning light'.
Postwar, Modern, and Contemporary Masters including Fernando Botero, Oriano Galloni, Thomas Hartmann, Robert Indiana, Alex Katz, Louise Nevelson, and Monolo Valdes
In addition to paintings by Hopper, Cadmus, and their contemporaries, the foundation purchased abstract work, including those of Stuart Davis, Louise Nevelson, and Mark Tobey.
Stierch, who had a one-year fellowship with founding organization Wiki Media, said she was astonished when she came across the entry for 19th-century American sculptor Louise Nevelson.
Ralph Peterson (commissioning cleric) and Easley Hamner (project architect) presented the work of Louis Nevelson created for the Chapel of the Good Shepherd in St Peter's Church in mid-town Manhattan (consecrated 1977).
Jonathan Lippincott, author of Large Scale, presents a photographic and narrative history of the sculptures made at the facility including works made by Claes Oldenburg, Louise Nevelson.
and Cirrus Editions--and artists: locals such as Richard Diebenkorn, Ed Moses, and Ed Ruscha, and artists who traveled to LA to make prints, including Joseph Albers, Louise Nevelson, Claes Oldenburg, and Robert Rauschenberg.
As for general influences in her artistic background, the artists to which she can relate best include Frank Stella, as in his most enormous painterly wall constructions; to Mark Rothko for his emotionally charged colour compositions and to the resonating sculptures of Louise Nevelson and Richard Serra for their formidable presence in their respective environments wherever their works are sited.
The refurbished galleries house iconic works by Grace Hartigan, Alex Katz, Robert Matta, Joan Mitchell, Louise Nevelson, Jackson Pollock, Tom Wesselmann and others, as well as more recent contributions from artists such as Louise Bourgeois, Chuck Close, Tony Feher, Elizabeth Murray, Cindy Sherman and Kiki Smith.
Other artistic forebears can be found in the post-minimal and process-oriented work of Eva Hesse, the metallic medium and enlarged scale of Richard Serra's sculpture, the monochromatic assemblages of Louise Nevelson, and the suggestive space of Louise Bourgeois's Personnages and Cells.