New Journalism

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New Journalism

n.
Journalism that is characterized by the reporter's subjective interpretations and often features fictional dramatized elements to emphasize personal involvement.

New Journalist n.

New Journalism

n
(Journalism & Publishing) a style of journalism originating in the US in the 1960s, which uses techniques borrowed from fiction to portray a situation or event as vividly as possible

New′ Jour′nalism


n.
journalism containing the writer's personal opinions and reactions and often fictional asides as added color.
References in periodicals archive ?
Collins asked to be a temporary stand-in until the new journalist was hired, but her editors patronized her.
Perhaps not surprisingly, 43% of new journalist said they might leave the profession entirely.
You never see her name mentioned as a New Journalist until she writes a feature story in the Post and it's exposed as a fraud," says Sims.
Finally, we have a new journalist initiative in the form of the Freedom Forum Foundation's recent commitment of funding to research and monitor media coverage of Congress.
Meek was introduced to Busby - by then recovering and taking his first steps back into the job - as the new journalist covering United for the Manchester Evening News.
The Sunday Mirror is up for Scoop of the Year and Amy Sharpe is up for New Journalist of the Year.
A few days ago, Egypt's top tier of writers, journalists, and media experts headed to the Four Seasons hotel to celebrate the birth of a promising new journalist.
I learned that the new journalist is both chronicler and storyteller-to bring about continuity and change, and that new journalism is about keeping alive the lessons of the past to forge a better future.
Glenn Greenwald, who built his bona fides at the Guardian newspaper by breaking the news about the National Security Agency's electronic surveillance efforts (with the help of information provided by Edward Snowden), has joined a new journalist venture, a "digital magazine" called the Intercept, which is bankrolled by eBay founder Pierre Omidyar.
Put another way, Markfield was the most gifted also-ran associated with the so-called Jewish-American literary renaissance of 1950s and '60s: His three Jew-obsessed comic novels were eclipsed by the titanic oeuvre of Philip Roth, his ideas regarding Jews and popular culture were massively elaborated by professor turned new journalist Albert Goldman, and his promising bid to establish himself as a wise-guy, street-smart luftmensh-intellectual Jewish film critic was upended by Manny Farber and trumped by Pauline Kael.
This is where small town lawman and a new journalist become the unlikely pair who must stop the enemy.
Racing Post head of news Tony Smurthwaite added: "Lee has worked extremely hard and shown great devotion to his craft to become an outstanding practitioner and I was overcome when his name was announced as the new journalist of the year.