newsboy

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news·boy

 (no͞oz′boi′, nyo͞oz′-)
n.
A boy who sells or delivers newspapers.

newsboy

(ˈnjuːzˌbɔɪ)
n
a boy who sells or delivers newspapers

news•boy

(ˈnuzˌbɔɪ, ˈnyuz-)

n.
a person, typically a boy, who sells or delivers newspapers.
[1755–65]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.newsboy - a boy who delivers newspapersnewsboy - a boy who delivers newspapers  
delivery boy, deliveryman, deliverer - someone employed to make deliveries
Translations

newsboy

[ˈnjuːzbɔɪ] N (= deliverer) → chico m que reparte periódicos; (= seller) → chico m que vende periódicos, voceador m (Mex)
References in classic literature ?
He seemed to be listening to the calling of the newsboys down the street.
It was curious to see newsboys selling papers in so dreamy a land as that.
Jake bought everything the newsboys offered him: candy, oranges, brass collar buttons, a watch-charm, and for me a `Life of Jesse James,' which I remember as one of the most satisfactory books I have ever read.
But my sons are neither boot-blacks nor newsboys, and I object to hearing them use such words as 'screamer,' 'bully,' and 'buster.
The newsboys, as he went, were crying themselves hoarse along the footways: "Special edition.
And so he dragged himself to the ENQUIRER alley, sick in body and soul, but learning the long patience, to confront his eternal enemy, Cheese-Face, who was just as sick as he, and just a bit willing to quit if it were not for the gang of newsboys that looked on and made pride painful and necessary.
While he stood listening, smiling cynically, several dapper young men stood by with notebooks in their hands, and it was not more than two hours later that Jurgis saw newsboys running about with armfuls of newspapers, printed in red and black letters six inches high:
She heard it in Boston yesterday --heard the newsboys crying it in the street.
From outside in the street came faintly to their ears the cry of a newsboy.
I remembered my inability to fix my mind that morning, scarcely a month gone by, and how I had broken off to get my DAILY CHRONICLE from the newsboy.
A newsboy on the streets, a sailor, a miner, a wanderer in far lands, always where men came together to exchange ideas, to laugh and boast and dare, to relax, to forget the dull toil of tiresome nights and days, always they came together over alcohol.
On a broad lamp pedestal in the centre of the roadway, a burly policeman was standing, leaning his back against the post in so natural an attitude that it was hard to realize that he was not alive, while at his feet there lay a ragged newsboy with his bundle of papers on the ground beside him.