comic strip

(redirected from Newspaper comic strips)
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comic strip

n.
1. A usually humorous narrative sequence of cartoon panels: taped a comic strip to her office door.
2. A series or serialization of such narrative sequences, usually featuring a regular cast of characters: a comic strip that has been syndicated for over 40 years.

comic strip

n
(Journalism & Publishing) a sequence of drawings in a newspaper, magazine, etc, relating a humorous story or an adventure. Also called: strip cartoon

com′ic strip`


n.
a sequence of drawings relating a comic incident, an adventure, etc., often serialized in daily newspapers.
[1915–20]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.comic strip - a sequence of drawings telling a story in a newspaper or comic bookcomic strip - a sequence of drawings telling a story in a newspaper or comic book
newspaper, paper - a daily or weekly publication on folded sheets; contains news and articles and advertisements; "he read his newspaper at breakfast"
comic book - a magazine devoted to comic strips
cartoon, sketch - a humorous or satirical drawing published in a newspaper or magazine
frame - a single drawing in a comic_strip
Translations
سِلْسَلَةُ رُسُومِ هَزْلِيَّةقِصَّه فُكاهِيَّه تَصْدُرُ في مُسَلْسَل
komikskreslený příběh
tegneserietegneseriestribe
sarjakuvasarjakuvastrippistrippi
strip
teiknimyndasyrpa
コマ割り漫画
4컷 만화
seriesidan
หนังสือการ์ตูน
çizgi öyküçizgi resimli öykü
truyện tranh cười thường kỳ

comic strip

nfumetto

comic

(ˈkomik) adjective
1. of comedy. a comic actor; comic opera.
2. causing amusement. comic remarks.
noun
1. an amusing person, especially a professional comedian.
2. a children's periodical containing funny stories, adventures etc in the form of comic strips.
ˈcomical adjective
funny. It was comical to see the chimpanzee pouring out a cup of tea.
comic strip
a series of small pictures showing stages in an adventure.

comic strip

سِلْسَلَةُ رُسُومِ هَزْلِيَّة komiks tegneseriestribe Comicstrip μικρή ιστορία κόμικ tira cómica sarjakuva bande dessinée strip fumetti コマ割り漫画 4컷 만화 stripverhaal tegneserie historyjka obrazkowa banda desenhada, história em quadrinhos комикс seriesidan หนังสือการ์ตูน çizgi öykü truyện tranh cười thường kỳ 连环漫画
References in periodicals archive ?
To stereotype all "furries" as sexual fetishists is to ignore the prevalence of anthropomorphic animals in human culture, from cave paintings to animated movies to graphic novels and newspaper comic strips.
Reminiscent of newspaper comic strips, each comic has a predictable gag structure with a few panels of set-up and one or two panels featuring the punchline.
Newspaper comic strips were common in the United States by the late 19th century.
Clean Up on Aisle Stupid" is the latest collection of the Get Fuzzy newspaper comic strips and continues the hilarious antics of a cat, a dog, and their long suffering master.
In Japan, the term manga can mean single-panel cartoons, newspaper comic strips, comic books, graphic novels, and occasionally animation.
Also included is a smattering of Smurf newspaper comic strips to round out the collection.
Frank Baum, writer of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz novel, its multiple sequels, a series of newspaper comic strips, and a range of promotional tie-in materials such as mock newspapers (see Table 1).
While newspapers are struggling to survive in the digital age, classic newspaper comic strips are living on in the physical world through licensed products.
5 million clipped newspaper comic strips and Sunday color comics.
In addition to examining the work of pioneering African American comic artists such as Jackie Ormes and Aaron McGruder, the book explores contemporary representations of black females in newspaper comic strips, black comics and social media economics, the graphic manga of Felipe Smith, and Condoleezza Rice in political cartoons.
In the 1950s, he started drawing newspaper comic strips, political cartoons and cover illustrations for Broadway's Playbill.
Created by Reg Smythe in 1957, Andy Capp became one of the most popular British newspaper comic strips.