Ngo Dinh Diem


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Related to Ngo Dinh Diem: Nguyen Van Thieu, Vietcong

Ngo Dinh Diem

(ˈŋoʊ ˈdin ˈdyɛm, ˈdzyɛm, ˈnoʊ ˈdin)
n.
1901–1963, president of South Vietnam 1956–63.
References in periodicals archive ?
Misalliance: Ngo Dinh Diem, the United States, and the Fate of South Vietnam, by Edward Miller.
For example, following Vietnam's partition in the wake of France's defeat at Dien Bien Phu in 1954, Ngo Dinh Diem, Vietnam's last non-Communist president, was able to turn to the U.
In the mid-50s, Ngo Dinh Diem, a Catholic anti-Communist nationalist, "enjoyed the backing of (Democratic) Senators John Kennedy and Mike Mansfield, Cardinal Francis J.
That places him in the same position as (bad puppet) South Vietnamese President Ngo Dinh Diem, who was murdered in a CIA-backed coup on November 2, 1963.
In his famous "pay any price, bear any burden" inaugural address, Kennedy put the Soviets on notice that his administration would prosecute the Cold War to the fullest, declaring that we "shall meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe, in order to assure the survival and the success of liberty" In Vietnam, this meant supporting the regime of Ngo Dinh Diem, whose dictatorship became increasingly repressive as Viet Cong forces gathered strength.
Misalliance; Ngo Dinh Diem, the United States, and the fate of South Vietnam.
At the time, I believe this phenomenon affected our initial support for Papa Doc in Haiti, Juan Bosch in the Dominican Republic and the coup in Vietnam against Ngo Dinh Diem.
This theme held true with the murder of Ngo Dinh Diem in 1963, which preceded Kennedy's own assassination by only a few weeks.
Immerman looks at nation-building efforts and relations with the Ngo Dinh Diem regime in South Vietnam during the Eisenhower and Kennedy administrations.
Upon hearing that the Navy would help in the transportation of French forces, Ngo Dinh Diem, the Prime Minister of the State of Vietnam (South Vietnam), estimated that no more than 10,000 citizens would desire to be taken to southern Vietnam, past the 17th parallel; however, Diem's calculation was off by hundreds of thousands.
Fifty years ago this November, we quietly directed the deposition of that scoundrel Ngo Dinh Diem in South Vietnam, an action leading to a host of unintended consequences, victory not among them.