Nicias


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Ni·ci·as

 (nĭsh′ē-əs, nĭs′-) Died 413 bc.
Athenian general and politician who arranged (421) a briefly observed truce with Sparta during the Peloponnesian War and was captured and killed during his command of the siege of Syracuse.

Nicias

(ˈnɪsɪəs)
n
(Biography) died 414 bc, Athenian statesman and general. He ended the first part of the Peloponnesian War by making peace with Sparta (421)
References in classic literature ?
Certainly we will, said Glaucon; and in a few minutes Polemarchus appeared, and with him Adeimantus, Glaucon's brother, Niceratus the son of Nicias, and several others who had been at the procession.
He dismisses the usefulness of their teaching in a phalanx (contra Cawkwell 1989:378) by having Nicias say that 'the greatest advantage of this training will be felt when the ranks are broken' (Pl.
But as was to occur again, Nicias was being too clever by half.
Nicias warned that an expedition made little strategic sense.
Adam Fisher also sang sweetly as the pagan noble, Nicias, though one feels he might have been struggling with the role with full orchestra.
Leading a naval force comprising thirty ships, he, along with Pythodoros and Demaratos, landed at Epidauros Limera (the Byzantine Monemvasia) and Prasiai, further south of modern Leonidio, and ravaged Spartan territories, a hostile action that blatantly violated the peace of Nicias.
See also Donald Kagan, The Peace of Nicias and the Sicilian Expedition, vol.
Alessandro Liberatore would be up to the task of incarnating Thais' suitor Nicias if it wasn't for the excessive vibrato constantly blurring his timbre.
Both Martha Nussbaum and Jacob Howland contend that Republic is set in the year 421, during the Peace of Nicias.
Alcibiades, Nicias, Demosthenes, all, the whole lot of them, gone.
From the Theatre of Dionysus, the sixteen thousand spectators departed, probably during the period of the fragile Peace of Nicias (421-416 BCE), (11) an uncertain "truce and alliance between the Spartans and the Athenians", which was not adhered to everywhere, and during which "they continued to harm one another greatly" (Thucydides V.
He achieved success in 1899 with the publication of his first poem, Nicias Moritous, later revised as The Turn of the Tide.