nicad

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nicad

(ˈnaɪˌkæd)
n
(Chemistry) a rechargeable dry-cell battery with a nickel anode and a cadmium cathode
[C20: ni(ckel) + cad(mium)]

ni•cad

(ˈnaɪˌkæd) Trademark.
a brand of nickel-cadmium battery.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nicad - a rechargeable battery with a nickel cathode and a cadmium anode; often used in emergency systems because of its low discharge rate when not in use
storage battery, accumulator - a voltaic battery that stores electric charge
References in periodicals archive ?
An overview of advanced batteries including their advantages, types of batteries such as Lithium-ion, lithium-ion polymer battery, nickel-cadmium battery, nickel metal hydride battery, SILX battery technology, smart nano batteries and the applications of such advanced batteries are explored.
Osaka, Aug 8, 2013 - (JCN Newswire) - Panasonic Corporation today announced the development of the industry's first*1 nickel-cadmium battery capable of charging and discharging at temperatures as low as -40 deg C (-40 deg F).
Airbus will use Lithium-Ion batteries for initial test flights due to start this year, but make the switch to the traditional and slightly heavier nickel-cadmium battery before the plane enters service.
Fumes from a lead-acid battery can cause a nickel-cadmium battery to discharge.
There is also the Explorer Cordless Frozen Concoction Maker, which is powered by an 18-volt nickel-cadmium battery, making it suitable for producing frozen beverages during tailgating parties or on boat trips.
An excerpt from an article printed in the summer 2003 issue of Mech (reprinted with permission from Touchdown-the Australian Navy Aviation Safety and Information Magazine) gave a good explanation of thermal runaway: "[It] is a condition in which the current for a fully charged nickel-cadmium battery rises out of proportion to the impressed-voltage level.
One of the most important changes in nickel-cadmium battery recycling in recent years has been the installation of the cadmium recovery plant at the Inmetco facility in Ellwood City, Pa.
Sanyo has been a leader in the development of nickel-cadmium rechargeable batteries since it developed a sealed nickel-cadmium battery in 1963.
In the nickel-cadmium battery segment, after having reached a peak in 1994, production also decreased, falling 21% in 1996 compared to the preceding year.
The Expresswriter retails for $499, excluding a 10-ounce, nickel-cadmium battery that lists for $125.
In addition, unlike the nickel-cadmium battery the rocking-chair battery can be short-circuited and totally discharged without being destroyed, he notes.