Nizam al-Mulk


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Nizam al-Mulk

(ælˈmʊlk)
n
(Biography) title of Abu Ali Hasan Ibn Ali. ?1018–92, Persian statesman; vizier of Persia (1063–92) for the Seljuk sultans: assassinated
References in periodicals archive ?
After completing his education, he joined the court of the Seljuk vizier Nizam al-Mulk in Isfahan in 1085.
Sabbah was giving hashish to his men and sending them to assassinate opponent state leaders, like Seljuk grand vizier Nizam al-Mulk, who ordered his arrest.
182-202), gives us a new perspective on the rise and fall of a (Shafi'i) family of religious scholars brought to Isfahan by Nizam al-Mulk, showing how their relationship with the Seljuqs was a classic example of an alliance between knowledge and power and how their conflict with the Hanafi community led by the Sa'ids was not simply a matter of doctrinal difference, but of power and the control of wealth.
47) Nizam al-Mulk notably has information, although probably indirectly, concerning Sunbadh's interests in Pahlavi learning, too; he writes that Subadh claimed to have read of the end of Arab rule presaged "in the books of the Sasiinids (az kutub-i bani Slisan).
The most important structures and decorations were added by Abu Ali Hassan ibn Ali (1018-1092), also known as Khwaja Nizam al-Mulk, a Persian vizier of the Seljuk sultans.
After the death of al-Juwayni, Ghazali went to the camp (al-mu'askar) (12) of the Saljuq wazir Nizam al-Mulk (d.
Se sabe que fue un hombre no solo dotado de perspicacia e inteligencia, sino tambien al tanto de la ciencia e interesado en la filosofia de aquel tiempo, sensible a la poesia--si hemos de hacer caso a la leyenda borgiana--, amigo intimo del sabio y poeta Omar Jayyam, y del visir Nizam al-Mulk.
Nizam al-Mulk insisted: "Spies must constantly go out to the limits of the kingdom in the guise of merchants, travellers, sufis, peddlers (of medicines), and mendicants, and bring back reports of everything they hear, so that no matters of any kind remain concealed .
Later, numerous madrasas were established across the Muslim world by the great Seljuk vizier, Nizam al-Mulk.
The great Seljuk ruler Nizam al-Mulk was assassinated by the Hashashins.
The match-up between Iranian Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei and Obama is not a battle between equals, but rather a historical grudge match between Nizam al-Mulk, the eleventh century Persian Machiavelli, and Neville Chamberlain or Jimmy Carter.
The latter works were produced earlier and in quite different socio-political circumstances than even, say, those of Nizam al-Mulk and Abu Nasr al-Utbi (both eleventh century).