no-till

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no-till

(nō′tĭl′)
n.
A system for planting crops without plowing, using herbicides to control weeds and resulting in reduced soil erosion and the preservation of soil nutrients.
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Other soil health best practices include no-till farming -- a planting method that involves drilling seeds directly into the stubble from the previous year's crops, rather than plowing up this residue, resulting in more soil moisture, weed suppression and increased yields; compost application -- using nutrient rich compost to improve soil productivity; and diversified farming -- planting several different types of crops and rotating them from year-to-year to improve biodiversity and soil biology.
In the 1970s no-till farming /minimum tillage was introduced.
No-till farming systems have led to many benefits such as increased soil flora and fauna biodiversity, increased organic matter, improved soil structure and fertility (Thomas et al.
And no-till farming retains more groundwater--but encourages weeds, which GMOs would help contain.
Farm and ranch land protection, including the practices that go along with protection, such as improving soil health, implementing no-till farming and enhancing wildlife habitat.
Ray Gaesser, who farms 6,000 acres of corn and soybeans in southwest Iowa near Corning, uses no-till farming, terraces on sloping land to prevent soil erosion, and has grass waterways to slow water runoff.
No-till farming has been recognized as an integral part of sustainable farming in Europe because it contributes to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and helps to protect soil from erosion.
crop protection, drip irrigation, drought tolerance, heat tolerance, integrated soil fertility management, no-till farming, nutritional use efficiency, organic agriculture, precision agriculture, sprinkler irrigation and water harvesting.
The company has applied, through agricultural experts from South Africa, the experience of no-till farming beside the use of modern technology in an area of 140 acres, which were planted with a variety of crops including genetically modified cotton and sunflower.
Meanwhile crop yields have risen dramatically, herbicide and pesticide use has declined, and no-till farming that cuts carbon dioxide emissions due to ploughing has become far more common.
The costs of transitioning from conventional to no-till farming can be considerable, so farmers are not always eager to make the switch.
It is natural to believe that no-till farming is tough.