Noahide Laws


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Noahide Laws

(ˈnəʊəˌhaɪd)
pl n
(Judaism) Judaism the seven laws given to Noah after the Flood, which decree the establishment of a fair system of justice in society, and prohibit idolatry, blasphemy, murder, adultery and incest, robbery, and the eating of flesh taken from a living animal
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Other chapters tell stories of King David's wisdom, messages he received from God through prophets, and a story of King David's interaction with Hiram, king of Tyre, where David advises him to observe the Noahide laws.
He was also reported in al-Quds as saying that if they, ]Gentiles [, don't agree to take on the Noahide Laws, they should be expelled to Saudi Arabia.
If a goy (gentile) is not prepared to accept the Seven Noahide Laws -- one of which is to not commit murder -- he should be sent to Saudi Arabia.
The tendency within traditional Judaism to view all non-Jews through the lens of the Noahide Laws or Commandments is not sufficient.
They further his thinking that natural law never appears as universal, but is always articulated in the specific context of the positive law tradition within particular cultures, which in the case of Judaism, is the Noahide laws.
Note three phenomena in these rulings: Maimonides ruled that the acceptance of the Noahide Laws (sheva mitzvot) was a requirement for salvation; he shifted the language of the Tosefta and Talmud from "tzaddikim"--righteous ones--and substituted the noun "hasidim"--pious ones; and he added the caveat in the selection from the "Laws of Kings"--not found elsewhere--that the pious non-Jews must accept the seven Noahide Laws as divinely revealed if they were to gain the next life's rewards.
Accordingly, not only will all the Jews of the world religiously observe God's Torah and commandments, but all non-Jews will observe the Seven Noahide Laws as defined by the Sages of Israel.
The seven Noahide Laws incumbent on all humanity, what we call "natural law," are traced to that ancient saga.
The rabbis reasoned that since murder is only one of the universal prohibitions in Noahide Laws and is punishable through spilling the blood of the criminal, so if must follow that all the other universal Noahide Laws were meant to be punished by the "spilling of blood" (hereg by sword).
The Hebrew Bible, Jewish Talmud and Jewish Cabalistic writings instruct Jews to murder Christians and to impose the "Noahide Laws" in the "End Times," which laws forbid Christianity on pain of death, because Jews consider Jesus to be an idol, and the Noahide Laws forbid idol worship.
While these laws predate the Talmud, the major study of these Noahide laws begins with the Babylonian Talmudic legal discussion of who was a resident-alien, the minimal requirements for citizenship in a Jewish state.
The Noahide laws may also be interpreted to support a kind relationship between humanity and the environment.