Noh

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Noh

also No  (nō)
n.
The classical drama of Japan, with music and dance performed in a highly stylized manner by elaborately dressed performers on an almost bare stage.

[Japanese , talent, ability, Noh, from Early Middle Chinese néŋ, be capable of, can, ability (also the source of Mandarin néeng).]

Noh

(nəʊ)
n
(Theatre) a variant spelling of No1

no1

(noʊ)

adv., n., pl. noes, nos. adv.
1. (a negative expressing dissent, denial, or refusal, as in response to a question or request.)
2. (used to emphasize or introduce a negative statement): No, not one of them came.
3. not in any degree or manner; not at all (used with a comparative): He is no better.
4. not: whether or no.
n.
5. an utterance of the word “no.”
6. a denial or refusal.
7. a negative vote or voter.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English nā, contraction of ne not + ā ever (see ay1)]

no2

(noʊ)

adj.
1. not any: no money.
2. not at all; far from being: He is no genius.
[1150–1200]

No


Chem. Symbol.
nobelium.

Noh

(noʊ)

n.
the classic drama of Japan, using chants and highly stylized movements and formal and thematic patterns derived from religious rites.
Compare kabuki.
[1870–75; < Japanese]

no.

or No.,

1. north.
2. northern.
3. number.
References in periodicals archive ?
Traditionally, Noh drama is powered by emotion so deep it can only be implied, aspiring to represent a mode of being beyond sorrow.
The other showed the Earth Spider, Tsuchigumo, a Noh drama written for the Kabuki stage by Kawataki Mokuami.
Curlew River, an English retelling of a classic Japanese Noh drama, Sumida River, focuses on a madwoman arriving at the river bank and wishing to cross in search of her kidnapped 10-year-old son.
An art form dating from the 14th century, Noh drama usually features heroic themes, stylized acting and masks, music and slow, grandiose gestures.
Central to the Noh drama of Japan, one of the world's oldest and most venerated dramatic traditions, is the image of the play as a story of the past recounted by a ghost, but ghostly storytellers and recalled events are the common coin of theatre everywhere in the world at every period.
Each of the productions, in attempting a seamless incorporation of music, masks and ritualistic movement, evinced Yeats's fascination with Japanese Noh drama.
For example, one popular style of netsuke--mask netsuke--reflect the cultural significance of the Noh drama.
He begins with describing the basic elements of Noh drama and key playwrights, followed by parallels between Noh and Shakespearean drama.
No doubt he's bored silly, since Noh drama has never had a popular audience, and its performers speak a language almost no one understands anymore; during the Edo period, before 1868, its audiences were mainly from the samurai class, which was never large and disappeared long before Teruo's birth.
He's mastering a new form, that of Japanese Noh drama, which integrates highly formalized dances with acting, singing, music and masks.
Aside from being perhaps the greatest swordsman who ever lived, he was also a dedicated poet, sculptor, and gardener, as well as knowing the "Way of the Tea; and was adept the recitation of Noh drama, garden design, and perhaps even carpentry.
It would have been very difficult for them to understand the aesthetics of Noh drama, with its underlying concept of "Yugen"--poetic gracefulness with a Buddhist sense of mutability--and the subtle symbolism of the masks.