soft goods

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soft goods

pl.n.

soft goods

or

softgoods

pl n
(Commerce) textile fabrics and related merchandise

soft′ goods`


n.pl.
the subclass of nondurable goods as represented esp. by textile products, as clothing and bedding; dry goods. Compare durable goods.
[1890–95]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.soft goods - textiles or clothing and related merchandise
commodity, trade good, good - articles of commerce
men's furnishings, haberdashery - the drygoods sold by a haberdasher
household linen, white goods - drygoods for household use that are typically made of white cloth
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
Translations

soft goods

npl (Comm) → tessili mpl
References in periodicals archive ?
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Working-day-adjusted and measured at constant prices, retail sales of non-durable goods, including sales in department stores and specialised grocery stores, decreased 0.
6 percent due to increased expenditures on durable and non-durable goods.