canonization

(redirected from Noncanonized)
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can·on·ize

 (kăn′ə-nīz′)
tr.v. can·on·ized, can·on·iz·ing, can·on·iz·es
1. To declare (a deceased person) to be a saint and entitled to be fully honored as such.
2. To include in the biblical canon.
3. To include in a literary canon.
4. To approve as being within canon law.
5. To treat as sacred; glorify.

can′on·i·za′tion (-ĭ-zā′shən) n.
can′on·iz′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.canonization - (Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Church) the act of admitting a deceased person into the canon of saints
sanctification - a religious ceremony in which something is made holy
Church of Rome, Roman Catholic Church, Roman Church, Western Church, Roman Catholic - the Christian Church based in the Vatican and presided over by a pope and an episcopal hierarchy
Eastern Church, Eastern Orthodox, Eastern Orthodox Church, Orthodox Catholic Church, Orthodox Church - derived from the Byzantine Church and adhering to Byzantine rites
Translations
prohlášení za svatého
helgenkåringkanonisering
szenttéavatás
upptaka í dÿrlingatölu
vyhlásenie za svätého
azizleştirmekazizlik payesi vermek

canonization

[ˌkænənaɪˈzeɪʃən] Ncanonización f

canonization

n (Eccl) → Heiligsprechung f, → Kanonisation f, → Kanonisierung f

canonization

[ˌkænənaɪˈzeɪʃn] ncanonizzazione f

canon

(ˈkӕnən) noun
1. a rule (especially of the church).
2. a clergyman belonging to a cathedral.
3. a list of saints.
4. a musical composition in which one part enters after another in imitation.
5. all the writings of an author that are accepted as genuine. the Shakespeare canon.
caˈnonical (-ˈno-) adjective
ˈcanonize, ˈcanonise verb
to place in the list of saints. Joan of Arc was canonized in 1920.
ˌcanoniˈzation, ˌcanoniˈsation noun
References in periodicals archive ?
Such discarding of the standard mystery plot might be interpreted via the critical work of Brian McHale, who traces the movement from modernist to postmodernist fiction as a shift from an epistemological to an ontological dominant, and who views "science fiction as postmodernism's noncanonized or 'low art' double, its sister genre in the same sense that the popular detective thriller is modernist fiction's sister-genre" (Postmodernist 59).
category are different from noncanonized works that were never valued
Brian McHale, meanwhile, finds that the categorization of science fiction lies in its dual relationship to the postmodern and to the popular, stating that, 'we can think of science fiction as postmodernism's noncanonized or "low art" double, its sister-genre in the same sense that the popular detective thriller is modernist fiction's sister-genre'.