Nonexecution

Non`ex`e`cu´tion


n.1.Neglect or failure of execution; nonperformance.
References in periodicals archive ?
After being posted as Pakistan ambassador in Berne during the peak time of Justice (R) Chaudhry Muhammad Iftikhar as Chief Justice of Pakistan, in which he sent pack home the then prime minister, Syed Yousif Raza Gilani, for the alleged contempt of court over nonexecution of the court orders in Swiss Case, Bhounr was hindering the process at his end, sources claimed.
The impact of flexibility on the withdrawal decision is more difficult to disentangle as it reflects the joint probability of either implementation or nonexecution.
In the meantime, members of the society stopped their payments due to nonexecution of work, and they approached the NAB Rawalpindi for refund of their deposited money.
Expressing deep concern about the nonexecution of policies meant for youths, he emphasised that the young- blood should be encouraged to come forward and fight red- tapism.
This practice of nonexecution of court decisions for some women might be a reason not to bring claims to the Islamic court.
represents completion power--or, more precisely, the nonexecution of
And I think I should be able to get them, because this time I've got Lawson dead to rights: His two key concessions--first, the nuclear alternatives of impeachment and nonexecution as constitutionally legitimate checks on the courts; and second, the legitimacy (or at least harmlessness) of the Rules of Decision Act as a statute declaratory of what should be understood as the proper constitutional rule in any event--give away the whole ballgame.
The nonexecution of First Principles in the United States leads to an interesting network effect.
136) precautionary orders,(137) ombudsmen's recommendations,(138) administrative inquiries,(139) the extrajudicial payment of damages,(140) and the administrative invalidation or nonexecution of public acts(141) am noteworthy in this regard.
we must choose either to 1) trade the certain death, by execution, of a convicted murderer for the probable survival of an indefinite number of murder victims whose future murder is less likely (whose survival is more likely)--if the convicted murderer's execution deters prospective murderers, as it might, or to 2) trade the certain survival of the convicted murderer for the probable loss of the lives of future murder victims more likely to be murdered because the convicted murderer's nonexecution might not deter prospective murderers, who could have been deterred by executing the convicted murderer.
It looks to me like it's just issues of nonexecution,'' Dorrell said.