nonreligious


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nonreligious

(ˌnɒnrɪˈlɪdʒəs)
adj
not of or relating to religious beliefs and practices
References in periodicals archive ?
Burris and Keri Raif examined five groups of people: (1) the lifelong religious who have maintained the same religious identity throughout their lives; (2) the lifelong nonreligious; (3) converts who weren't raised within a religious tradition but who now identify with one; (4) switchers who grew up with one religious identity and then switched to another; and (5) apostates who grew up religious but who now identify as nonreligious, agnostic, or atheist.
Nonreligious Americans' coolness toward evangelicals dampens their chances.
It uses sociological research and interviews with men and women across the country to consider the moral convictions that govern secular individuals, considering that nonreligious Americans with spiritual self-reliance hold their own moral code outside of religious belief.
Rogers commented, "And also to secular and nonreligious people around the globe.
Proposals for the new tougher GCSE have been backed by a wide range of faith groups - although some campaigners have raised concerns that an option to study a nonreligious view was not included.
Humanists were "disappointed" there was no nonreligious study option.
Are religious people as equally prone to immoral acts as nonreligious people?
It is heartening, therefore, to see that the marriage bill passing through Parliament now includes a provision for Humanist, nonreligious weddings to be given the same legal status that religious weddings now enjoy.
Supreme Court rulings that ensure that religious groups have the same rights to hold meetings at public school facilities as nonreligious organizations.
The concentration of nonreligious Americans is even greater for those under the age of 30: One in three say they are not a member of any religious group.
Members of the Church of Scotland have a 30 per cent rate of obesity, the survey found, with nonreligious persons coming in second with a rate of 26 per cent.
The letter noted that even if the funding were somehow earmarked only for nonreligious activities, the grant would still be unconstitutional.