nonsense verse

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Related to Nonsense rhyme: nonsense verse, Nonsense poetry

nonsense verse

n.
Verse characterized by humor or whimsy and often featuring nonce words.

nonsense verse

n
(Poetry) verse in which the sense is nonexistent or absurd, such as that of Edward Lear
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nonsense verse - nonsensical writing (usually verse)
hokum, meaninglessness, nonsense, nonsensicality, bunk - a message that seems to convey no meaning
Translations

nonsense verse

nNonsensvers m, → Unsinnsvers m; (= genre)Nonsensverse pl, → Unsinnsverse pl
References in classic literature ?
I suppose the reader never makes nonsense rhymes from sheer gladness of heart,--nursery doggerel to keep time with the rippling of the stream, or the dancing of the sun, or the beating of his heart; the gibberish of delight.
He taught all the grandchildren his 'Oroj Chickeroj, chickeroj-a-pony' nonsense rhyme.
Child readers and their parents should all enjoy this hilarious Australian slant on the old nonsense rhyme.
In Edward Lear's nonsense rhyme The Owl And The Pussycat mention is made of a runcible spoon.
Their practising of words, phrases, songs and nonsense rhyme has the freedom and rhythm of poetry.
Ask the children to draw a picture to illustrate this nonsense rhyme.
The singers' musical director, Beresford King-Smith, has dedicated The Golden Journey To Samarkand to the choir and pianist Rosemary Robinson has set the nonsense rhyme The Jabberwocky to music in the style of Handel, for which soloists and instrumentalists will join the choir.
This is the first line of a Christmas song that sounds like a nonsense rhyme, but it may date from the 16th century when it was used to teach the central features of the Christian faith.
So to pass on Catholic teachings, the Jesuits invented this nonsense rhyme.
A circle of mud-stained outstretched hands is bracketed by the children's nonsense rhyme "Rain, rain, go away," in Italian and English.
Former Goon Spike Milligan's nonsense rhyme On The Ning Nang Nong was named the nation's favourite comic poem in a poll organised by the BBC.
Comfortably presented on brilliantly buffed board books, with jaunty rainbow colored silly verses and repetitive nonsense rhymes, "A Sailor Went to Sea, Sea, Sea" begs to be held, read, and sung together.