non sequitur

(redirected from Nonsequitur)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

non se·qui·tur

 (nŏn sĕk′wĭ-tər, -to͝or′)
n.
1. An inference or conclusion that does not follow from the premises or evidence.
2. A statement that does not follow logically from what preceded it.

[Latin nōn sequitur, it does not follow : nōn, not + sequitur, third person sing. present tense of sequī, to follow.]

non sequitur

(ˈnɒn ˈsɛkwɪtə)
n
1. a statement having little or no relevance to what preceded it
2. (Logic) logic a conclusion that does not follow from the premises
Abbreviation: non seq
[Latin, literally: it does not follow]

non se•qui•tur

(nɒn ˈsɛk wɪ tər, -ˌtʊər)
n.
1. an inference or a conclusion that does not follow from the premises.
2. a comment that is unrelated to a preceding one.
[1540–50; < Latin: it does not follow]

non sequitur

A Latin phrase meaning it does not follow, used to mean something that does not follow logically from what has already been stated .
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.non sequitur - a reply that has no relevance to what preceded it
reply, response - the speech act of continuing a conversational exchange; "he growled his reply"
2.non sequitur - (logic) a conclusion that does not follow from the premises
conclusion - an intuitive assumption; "jump to a conclusion"
logic - the branch of philosophy that analyzes inference
Translations
johtopäätösväärä

non sequitur

[ˌnɒnˈsekwitəʳ] Nincongruencia f, falta f de lógica
it's a non sequitures una incongruencia

non sequitur

nunlogische (Schluss)folgerung

non sequitur

[ˌnɒnˈsɛkwɪtəʳ] n it is a non sequiturè illogico
References in periodicals archive ?
He arrives at a nonsequitur ("So, thou conclud'st that pleasure only flows / Upon the stream of riches" [28-29]) that suggests that the previous part of the exchange had been a playful preliminary for the real business of plotting the disinheritance of Charlemont, the pursuit of an "increase of substance" to ensure "My eternity" in his sons: "My life in them / And their succession shall forever live, / And in my reason dwells the providence / To add to life as much of happiness" (1.
Hilbay denounced that this nonsequitur demeans the capacity of homosexuals to enter into committed relationships and no additional argument is presented as to why the creation of an across-the-board, systemic incentive through the recognition of same-sex marriage will lead specific gay individuals to choose petitioner over any other homosexual.
conservative institution, The Washington Times, carried this nonsequitur headline on June 9, 2009: "America's First Muslim President?
There are a number of problems with this sentence besides the nonsequitur of Aldrich Ames.
Unfortunately, what follows his articulation of that challenge reads like an anticlimax--perhaps even a nonsequitur.
Thus the nonsequitur of Jason Kenney's sudden feminism, as though someone inexplicably briefed him with a powerpoint presentation on the writings of Emmanuel Levinas.
This last point about marriage might seem to be a nonsequitur in relation to the issues about language and interpretation I have begun to introduce, but my point in this essay is to demonstrate that the restoration of language (via a retrieved document or statements made in a court of law) is intimately connected in Southworth's fictions to the successful completion of the marriage plot, the necessary terminus of all sentimental novels.
The only one who would go on record was a spokesman for Mike Antonovich, who has to win the Nonsequitur of the Year Award for his reply: "My boss prefers green tea.
This is why in the Symposium philosophy itself is a function of our mortality and why the whole concept of divine knowledge is a nonsequitur, since knowledge implies reference--an act of re-fering one thing to another--and hence must logically include otherness and separation, and thus gaps, errors, lack, and ultimately death.
Particularly when host Jim Spence produced the greatest nonsequitur of all time as he asked for analysis of the big deals of the day.
But it is a nonsequitur to conclude, as Rawls does, that when indeterminacy does obtain, "[i]nstitutions within the permitted range are equally just.