irritable bowel syndrome

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irritable bowel syndrome

n. Abbr. IBS
A chronic disorder characterized by motor abnormalities of the small and large intestines, causing variable symptoms including cramping, abdominal pain, constipation, and diarrhea. Also called irritable colon, spastic colon.

irritable bowel syndrome

n
(Medicine) med a chronic condition of recurring abdominal pain with constipation or diarrhoea or both

irritable bowel syndrome

A condition in which the muscle movement in the large intestine is disturbed, resulting in pain and bowel irregularity. Its cause is unknown.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.irritable bowel syndrome - recurrent abdominal pain and diarrhea (often alternating with periods of constipation); often associated with emotional stress
colitis, inflammatory bowel disease - inflammation of the colon
Translations

irritable bowel syndrome

nReizdarm m
References in periodicals archive ?
Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) group and nonulcer dyspepsia (NUD) group were again subdivided into two categories based on prior premedication or no premedication with PPI/H2RA before endoscopy.
Gastroduodenal infl ammation in patients with nonulcer dyspepsia.
As shown in Table 1, of the total 70 cases, 39 cases of chronic superficial gastritis, 9 cases of gastric ulcer, 9 cases of adenocarcinoma, 8 cases of nonulcer dyspepsia, and 5 cases of atrophic gastritis with intestinal metaplasia were observed.
Endoscopic and histological comparison of nonulcer dyspepsia with and without Helicobacter pylori infection evaluated by the modified Sydney system.
Nonulcer dyspepsia in a Dutch working population and Helicobacter pylori.
Further analyses of subgroups of patients showed that it remained superior regardless of whether patients had peptic ulcer disease or nonulcer dyspepsia.
Birnbaum made a clinical diagnosis of nonulcer dyspepsia.
It is estimated that 20-40% of all Americans suffer from nonulcer dyspepsia.
pylori prevalence among a subset of Africans of non-Caucasian descent with nonulcer dyspepsia attending a gastroenterology clinic was 71%, the same as in our study.
This group would include the 10-15% of the population with undiagnosed gastroduodenal ulcer disease and some patients with nonulcer dyspepsia who would respond to treatment.