Norman


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Nor·man 1

 (nôr′mən)
n.
1.
a. A member of a Scandinavian people who settled in northern France in the tenth century.
b. A descendant of this people, especially one ruling or inhabiting England from the time of the Norman Conquest.
2. A native or inhabitant of Normandy.
adj.
1. Of or relating to Normandy, the Normans, their culture, or their language.
2. Of or being a style of Romanesque architecture that was introduced from Normandy into England before 1066 and that flourished until about 1200.

[Middle English, from Old French Normant (from Old Norse Nordhmadhr : nordhr, north + madhr, man) and from Old English Norman (variant of Northman : north, north; see ner- in Indo-European roots + man, man; see man- in Indo-European roots).]

Nor·man 2

 (nôr′mən)
A city of central Oklahoma south of Oklahoma City. The University of Oklahoma opened here in 1892.

Norman

(ˈnɔːmən)
n
1. (Historical Terms) (in the Middle Ages) a member of the people of Normandy descended from the 10th-century Scandinavian conquerors of the country and the native French
2. (Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Normandy
3. (Languages) another name for Norman French
adj
4. (Historical Terms) of, relating to, or characteristic of the Normans, esp the Norman kings of England, the Norman people living in England, or their dialect of French
5. of, relating to, or characteristic of Normandy or its inhabitants
6. (Architecture) denoting, relating to, or having the style of Romanesque architecture used in Britain from the Norman Conquest until the 12th century. It is characterized by the rounded arch, the groin vault, massive masonry walls, etc

Norman

(ˈnɔːmən)
n
1. (Biography) Greg. born 1955, Australian golfer: winner of the British Open (1986, 1993)
2. (Biography) Jessye (ˈdʒɛsɪ). born 1945, US soprano: noted for her interpretations of Wagner and Mahler

Nor•man

(ˈnɔr mən)

n.
1.
a. any of the Scandinavian raiders who in the 10th century settled in N France and established the duchy of Normandy.
b. any of their Gallicized and Christianized descendants who established feudal regimes in the British Isles, Sicily, and S Italy in the 11th and 12th centuries.
2. a native or inhabitant of modern Normandy.
3.
b. the French dialect of modern Normandy.
4. a city in central Oklahoma. 78,280.
adj.
5. of or pertaining to Normandy, the Normans, or their speech.
6. of or pertaining to Romanesque architecture built by the Normans, esp. in England after 1066.
[1175–1225; < Old French Normant < Old Norse Northmathr Northman]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Norman - United States operatic soprano (born in 1945)
2.Norman - Australian golfer (born in 1955)
3.Norman - an inhabitant of Normandy
Normandie, Normandy - a former province of northwestern France on the English channel; divided into Haute-Normandie and Basse-Normandie
French person, Frenchman, Frenchwoman - a person of French nationality
Adj.1.Norman - of or relating to or characteristic of Normandy; "Norman beaches"
2.Norman - of or relating to or characteristic of the Normans; "the Norman Invasion in 1066"
Translations
Nordbonormandnormandiska

Norman

[ˈnɔːmən]
A. ADJnormando
the Norman Conquestla conquista de los normandos
Norman architecturearquitectura f románica
B. Nnormando/a m/f

Norman

[ˈnɔːrmən]
nNormand(e) m/f
adj [history, castle, architecture, culture] → normand(e)

Norman

adjnormannisch; the Norman Conquestder normannische Eroberungszug
nNormanne m, → Normannin f

Norman

[ˈnɔːmən] n & adjnormanno/a
References in classic literature ?
Then the master he took me into the stable under old Norman, the coachman that was then.
Back of those men's time the English are just simply foreigners, nothing more, nothing less; they talk Danish, German, Norman French, and sometimes a mixture of all three; back of THEM, they talk Latin, and ancient British, Irish, and Gaelic; and then back of these come billions and billions of pure savages that talk a gibberish that Satan himself couldn't understand.
The idea of this contrast was taken from the ingenious and unfortunate Logan's tragedy of Runnamede, in which, about the same period of history, the author had seen the Saxon and Norman barons opposed to each other on different sides of the stage.
No Gothic scourge of God, no Vandal pest of nations, no fabled fugitive from the flames of Troy, no bastard Norman tyrant, appears among the list of worthies who first landed on the rock, which your veneration has preserved as a lasting monument of their achievement.
There be one or two civil matters to settle with certain Norman noblemen, in which I crave your aid.
In England, for a long time after the Norman Conquest, the authority of the monarch was almost unlimited.
Hers was a Norman beauty, fresh, high-colored, redundant, the flesh of Rubens covering the muscles of the Farnese Hercules, and not the slender articulations of the Venus de' Medici, Apollo's graceful consort.
D'Artagnan, half stupefied, without his doublet, and with his head bound up in a linen cloth, arose then, and urged by the host, began to descend the stairs; but on arriving at the kitchen, the first thing he saw was his antagonist talking calmly at the step of a heavy carriage, drawn by two large Norman horses.
Then the sweeping changes which followed the Norman Conquest wiped out all lesser records than its own.
In the valley beneath lay the city they had just left, its more prominent buildings showing as in an isometric drawing--among them the broad cathedral tower, with its Norman windows and immense length of aisle and nave, the spires of St Thomas's, the pinnacled tower of the College, and, more to the right, the tower and gables of the ancient hospice, where to this day the pilgrim may receive his dole of bread and ale.
De Montfort has told him as much a dozen times, and now that all of us, both Norman and Saxon barons, have already met together and formed a pact for our mutual protection the King must surely realize that the time for temporizing be past, and that unless he would have a civil war upon his hands he must keep the promises he so glibly makes, instead of breaking them the moment De Montfort's back be turned.
Opposite him was Arthur, and Arthur's brother, Norman.