Norman


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Nor·man 1

 (nôr′mən)
n.
1.
a. A member of a Scandinavian people who settled in northern France in the tenth century.
b. A descendant of this people, especially one ruling or inhabiting England from the time of the Norman Conquest.
2. A native or inhabitant of Normandy.
adj.
1. Of or relating to Normandy, the Normans, their culture, or their language.
2. Of or being a style of Romanesque architecture that was introduced from Normandy into England before 1066 and that flourished until about 1200.

[Middle English, from Old French Normant (from Old Norse Nordhmadhr : nordhr, north + madhr, man) and from Old English Norman (variant of Northman : north, north; see ner- in Indo-European roots + man, man; see man- in Indo-European roots).]

Nor·man 2

 (nôr′mən)
A city of central Oklahoma south of Oklahoma City. The University of Oklahoma opened here in 1892.

Norman

(ˈnɔːmən)
n
1. (Historical Terms) (in the Middle Ages) a member of the people of Normandy descended from the 10th-century Scandinavian conquerors of the country and the native French
2. (Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Normandy
3. (Languages) another name for Norman French
adj
4. (Historical Terms) of, relating to, or characteristic of the Normans, esp the Norman kings of England, the Norman people living in England, or their dialect of French
5. of, relating to, or characteristic of Normandy or its inhabitants
6. (Architecture) denoting, relating to, or having the style of Romanesque architecture used in Britain from the Norman Conquest until the 12th century. It is characterized by the rounded arch, the groin vault, massive masonry walls, etc

Norman

(ˈnɔːmən)
n
1. (Biography) Greg. born 1955, Australian golfer: winner of the British Open (1986, 1993)
2. (Biography) Jessye (ˈdʒɛsɪ). born 1945, US soprano: noted for her interpretations of Wagner and Mahler

Nor•man

(ˈnɔr mən)

n.
1.
a. any of the Scandinavian raiders who in the 10th century settled in N France and established the duchy of Normandy.
b. any of their Gallicized and Christianized descendants who established feudal regimes in the British Isles, Sicily, and S Italy in the 11th and 12th centuries.
2. a native or inhabitant of modern Normandy.
3.
b. the French dialect of modern Normandy.
4. a city in central Oklahoma. 78,280.
adj.
5. of or pertaining to Normandy, the Normans, or their speech.
6. of or pertaining to Romanesque architecture built by the Normans, esp. in England after 1066.
[1175–1225; < Old French Normant < Old Norse Northmathr Northman]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Norman - United States operatic soprano (born in 1945)
2.Norman - Australian golfer (born in 1955)
3.Norman - an inhabitant of Normandy
Normandie, Normandy - a former province of northwestern France on the English channel; divided into Haute-Normandie and Basse-Normandie
French person, Frenchman, Frenchwoman - a person of French nationality
Adj.1.Norman - of or relating to or characteristic of Normandy; "Norman beaches"
2.Norman - of or relating to or characteristic of the Normans; "the Norman Invasion in 1066"
Translations
Nordbonormandnormandiska

Norman

[ˈnɔːmən]
A. ADJnormando
the Norman Conquestla conquista de los normandos
Norman architecturearquitectura f románica
B. Nnormando/a m/f

Norman

[ˈnɔːrmən]
nNormand(e) m/f
adj [history, castle, architecture, culture] → normand(e)

Norman

adjnormannisch; the Norman Conquestder normannische Eroberungszug
nNormanne m, → Normannin f

Norman

[ˈnɔːmən] n & adjnormanno/a
References in classic literature ?
I am no king's man," replied the boy quietly, "I am Norman of Torn, who has neither a king nor a god, and who says 'by your leave' to no man.
Then we shall be friends, Norman of Torn, for albeit I have few enemies no man has too many friends, and I like your face and your manner, though there be much to wish for in your manners.
And soon through all the land the Norman power spread.
And the English, too, as Norman power grew, clung more and more to the memory of the past.
The Norman genius, talent for affairs as its main basis, with strenuousness and clear rapidity for its excellence, hardness and insolence for its defect.
In most respects, or all, the Norman conquest accomplished precisely that racial rejuvenation of which, as we have seen, Anglo-Saxon England stood in need.
The power bad been completely placed in the hands of the Norman nobility, by the event of the battle of Hastings, and it had been used, as our histories assure us, with no moderate hand.
The dialogue which they maintained between them, was carried on in Anglo-Saxon, which, as we said before, was universally spoken by the inferior classes, excepting the Norman soldiers, and the immediate personal dependants of the great feudal nobles.
Another from the Norman whizzed into the waist, broke the back of a horse, and crashed its way through the side of the vessel.
It was a wild chaos where axe and sword rose and fell, while Englishman, Norman, and Italian staggered and reeled on a deck which was cumbered with bodies and slippery with blood.
It was true, she was accompanied by her brother, Norman, and it was true that they tried to ignore him and that Norman attempted to wave him aside.
If you interfere with my sister, I'll call an officer," Norman threatened.