Norman French


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Norman French

n.
The dialect of Old French used in medieval Normandy.

Norman French

n
(Languages) the medieval Norman and English dialect of Old French. See also Anglo-French3

Nor′man French′


n.
1. the form of French spoken by the Normans in the 11th and 12th centuries.
[1595–1605]
Nor′man-French′, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Norman French - the medieval Norman dialect of Old French
French - the Romance language spoken in France and in countries colonized by France
References in classic literature ?
For a long time after the Normans came to England, they spoke Norman French.
Back of those men's time the English are just simply foreigners, nothing more, nothing less; they talk Danish, German, Norman French, and sometimes a mixture of all three; back of THEM, they talk Latin, and ancient British, Irish, and Gaelic; and then back of these come billions and billions of pure savages that talk a gibberish that Satan himself couldn't understand.
Staged in Caldicot Castle, a Norman castle which dates from about 1100, Ms James said during its heyday the court was likely to be bilingual with both Welsh and Norman French heard within its walls.
It was written in Latin and debated in Norman French by a king whose throne was, for the most part, across the Channel and whose son, Henry III, had to appeal to a European court (of Louis IX) to arbitrate his own dispute with his English barons fifty years later.
Norman French, 70, from Marston Green, served in places as far as South America and Yemen when he served as a Lance Corporal in the guards from 1961 to 1967.
99) Dressers have become synonymous with Wales, even if they were named after a Norman French word, to prepare food, and became popular in Britain in the form we know them after Charles II returned from France in the Restoration in the 17th century.
Just as many modern English words derive from Latin - because the south has been so heavily influenced by first Roman and then Norman French culture - so many older and Geordie words have close equivalents in Anglo-Saxon.
Norman French was never used in royal assent ceremonies.
Turns out Shitterton is recorded in Norman French in the Domesday Book as Scatera or Scetra which, translated, means a little town that is on the stream of a sewer.
So the royal houses in the provinces never got closure in the minds of the populace because their dictatorships succumbed to market forces, namely the strength and power of the royal houses imposed on the Anglo-Saxon British by the Norman French.
Its name is believed to be derived from the Norman French word for armourer.
Based in the Vale of Belvoir (pronounced 'beaver' but a derivative of Norman French meaning 'beautiful view'), it was opened in 1955 as a venue for the Belvoir Hunt's point-to-point.