Norman

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Related to Normans: Saxons, Vikings, William the Conqueror

Nor·man 1

 (nôr′mən)
n.
1.
a. A member of a Scandinavian people who settled in northern France in the tenth century.
b. A descendant of this people, especially one ruling or inhabiting England from the time of the Norman Conquest.
2. A native or inhabitant of Normandy.
adj.
1. Of or relating to Normandy, the Normans, their culture, or their language.
2. Of or being a style of Romanesque architecture that was introduced from Normandy into England before 1066 and that flourished until about 1200.

[Middle English, from Old French Normant (from Old Norse Nordhmadhr : nordhr, north + madhr, man) and from Old English Norman (variant of Northman : north, north; see ner- in Indo-European roots + man, man; see man- in Indo-European roots).]

Nor·man 2

 (nôr′mən)
A city of central Oklahoma south of Oklahoma City. The University of Oklahoma opened here in 1892.

Norman

(ˈnɔːmən)
n
1. (Historical Terms) (in the Middle Ages) a member of the people of Normandy descended from the 10th-century Scandinavian conquerors of the country and the native French
2. (Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Normandy
3. (Languages) another name for Norman French
adj
4. (Historical Terms) of, relating to, or characteristic of the Normans, esp the Norman kings of England, the Norman people living in England, or their dialect of French
5. of, relating to, or characteristic of Normandy or its inhabitants
6. (Architecture) denoting, relating to, or having the style of Romanesque architecture used in Britain from the Norman Conquest until the 12th century. It is characterized by the rounded arch, the groin vault, massive masonry walls, etc

Norman

(ˈnɔːmən)
n
1. (Biography) Greg. born 1955, Australian golfer: winner of the British Open (1986, 1993)
2. (Biography) Jessye (ˈdʒɛsɪ). born 1945, US soprano: noted for her interpretations of Wagner and Mahler

Nor•man

(ˈnɔr mən)

n.
1.
a. any of the Scandinavian raiders who in the 10th century settled in N France and established the duchy of Normandy.
b. any of their Gallicized and Christianized descendants who established feudal regimes in the British Isles, Sicily, and S Italy in the 11th and 12th centuries.
2. a native or inhabitant of modern Normandy.
3.
b. the French dialect of modern Normandy.
4. a city in central Oklahoma. 78,280.
adj.
5. of or pertaining to Normandy, the Normans, or their speech.
6. of or pertaining to Romanesque architecture built by the Normans, esp. in England after 1066.
[1175–1225; < Old French Normant < Old Norse Northmathr Northman]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Norman - United States operatic soprano (born in 1945)
2.Norman - Australian golfer (born in 1955)
3.Norman - an inhabitant of Normandy
Normandie, Normandy - a former province of northwestern France on the English channel; divided into Haute-Normandie and Basse-Normandie
French person, Frenchman, Frenchwoman - a person of French nationality
Adj.1.Norman - of or relating to or characteristic of Normandy; "Norman beaches"
2.Norman - of or relating to or characteristic of the Normans; "the Norman Invasion in 1066"
Translations
Nordbonormandnormandiska

Norman

[ˈnɔːmən]
A. ADJnormando
the Norman Conquestla conquista de los normandos
Norman architecturearquitectura f románica
B. Nnormando/a m/f

Norman

[ˈnɔːrmən]
nNormand(e) m/f
adj [history, castle, architecture, culture] → normand(e)

Norman

adjnormannisch; the Norman Conquestder normannische Eroberungszug
nNormanne m, → Normannin f

Norman

[ˈnɔːmən] n & adjnormanno/a
References in classic literature ?
The Normans and the Bretons were very different peoples, as different as the Britons and the English.
The Normans, then, brought tales of Arthur with them when they came to England.
The Normans who conquered England were originally members of the same stock as the 'Danes' who had harried and conquered it in the preceding centuries--the ancestors of both were bands of Baltic and North Sea pirates who merely happened to emigrate in different directions; and a little farther back the Normans were close cousins, in the general Germanic family, of the Anglo-Saxons themselves.
For the Normans brought with them from France the zest for joy and beauty and dignified and stately ceremony in which the Anglo-Saxon temperament was poor--they brought the love of light-hearted song and chivalrous sports, of rich clothing, of finely-painted manuscripts, of noble architecture in cathedrals and palaces, of formal religious ritual, and of the pomp and display of all elaborate pageantry.
Four generations had not sufficed to blend the hostile blood of the Normans and Anglo-Saxons, or to unite, by common language and mutual interests, two hostile races, one of which still felt the elation of triumph, while the other groaned under all the consequences of defeat.
This state of things I have thought it necessary to premise for the information of the general reader, who might be apt to forget, that, although no great historical events, such as war or insurrection, mark the existence of the Anglo-Saxons as a separate people subsequent to the reign of William the Second; yet the great national distinctions betwixt them and their conquerors, the recollection of what they had formerly been, and to what they were now reduced, continued down to the reign of Edward the Third, to keep open the wounds which the Conquest had inflicted, and to maintain a line of separation betwixt the descendants of the victor Normans and the vanquished Saxons.
Cowed and disheartened by the loss of their leader, the Normans had given back and were now streaming over the bulwarks on to their own galley, dropping a dozen at a time on to her deck, But the anchor still held them in its crooked claw, and Sir Oliver with fifty men was hard upon their heels.
Another from the Norman whizzed into the waist, broke the back of a horse, and crashed its way through the side of the vessel.
I am no king's man," replied the boy quietly, "I am Norman of Torn, who has neither a king nor a god, and who says 'by your leave' to no man.
Then we shall be friends, Norman of Torn, for albeit I have few enemies no man has too many friends, and I like your face and your manner, though there be much to wish for in your manners.
It was true, she was accompanied by her brother, Norman, and it was true that they tried to ignore him and that Norman attempted to wave him aside.
If you interfere with my sister, I'll call an officer," Norman threatened.