saga

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Related to Norse sagas: List of other Norse sagas

sa·ga

 (sä′gə)
n.
1.
a. A prose narrative usually written in Iceland between 1120 and 1400, dealing with the families that first settled Iceland and their descendants, with the histories of the kings of Norway, and with the myths and legends of early Germanic gods and heroes.
b. A modern prose narrative that resembles a saga.
2. A long detailed report: recounted the saga of their family problems.

[Old Norse; see sekw- in Indo-European roots.]

saga

(ˈsɑːɡə)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) any of several medieval prose narratives written in Iceland and recounting the exploits of a hero or a family
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) any similar heroic narrative
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) Also called: saga novel a series of novels about several generations or members of a family
4. (Theatre) any other artistic production said to resemble a saga
5. informal a series of events or a story stretching over a long period
[C18: from Old Norse: a narrative; related to Old English secgan to say1]

sa•ga

(ˈsɑ gə)

n., pl. -gas.
1. a medieval Scandinavian prose narrative of events in the lives of historical or legendary individuals or families.
2. any narrative of heroic exploits.
3. Also called sa′ga nov`el. a form of novel that chronicles the members or generations of a family or social group.
[1700–10; < Old Norse; c. saw3]

saga

- Old Norse for "narrative."
See also related terms for narrative.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.saga - a narrative telling the adventures of a hero or a familysaga - a narrative telling the adventures of a hero or a family; originally (12th to 14th centuries) a story of the families that settled Iceland and their descendants but now any prose narrative that resembles such an account
adventure story, heroic tale - a story of an adventure

saga

noun
1. carry-on, to-do, performance (informal) (informal, chiefly Brit.), rigmarole, soap opera, pantomime (informal), chain of events, catalogue of disasters the whole saga of Hoddle's dismissal
2. epic, story, tale, legend, adventure, romance, narrative, chronicle, yarn, fairy tale, folk tale, roman-fleuve (French) a Nordic saga of giants and trolls
Translations
رِواية طَويلَة عن أجيال أسْرَةٍ واحِدَه
sága
saga
családregény
saga
佐賀市佐賀県
sāgastāsts
sága

saga

[ˈsɑːgə] N (Hist) → saga f; (= novel) → serie f (de novelas) (fig) → epopeya f
he told me the whole saga of what had happenedme contó toda la odisea or historia de lo ocurrido

saga

[ˈsɑːgə] n
(= Nordic legend) → saga f
(= long story) → épopée f

saga

nSaga f; (= novel also)Generationsroman m; (fig)Geschichte f, → Story f (inf)

saga

[ˈsɑːgə] nsaga

saga

(ˈsaːgə) noun
a long, detailed story. I expect he told you the saga of his troubles.
References in classic literature ?
Take up the literature of 1835, and you will find the poets and novelists asking for the same impossible gift as did the German Minnesingers long before them and the old Norse Saga writers long before that.
It means North Wales could follow the lead of Iceland presently enjoying its highest-ever visitor numbers - as Americans and Canadians make the trek to see where, according to Norse sagas, Lief Erikson set sail for the New World.
The story, based on Norse sagas, of the second-breakfast-eating reluctant hero Bilbo Baggins, and his hairy-footed adventures, has been turned into blockbusting films, as well as cartoons and plays.
Some topics covered include supernatural Greenland in the Old Norse sagas, mesmerism and Victorian arctic exploration, Johannes KeplerAEs Somnium, Septentrio, and the writings of Hinrich Rink and Knud Rasmussen.
Myths and Legends tells the story of the creation of the world as depicted in traditional Scandinavian folk tunes and Old Norse sagas, including the Icelandic Eddas which inspired Wagner.
The trip finished with a traditional reading from the Norse Sagas by Viking novelist Giles Kristian, who presented each volunteer with a copy of one of his latest books.
For the burning of the boat re-enactment the children split into groups to tell Norse sagas and the children wore clothes like Vikings as their presented the stories.
In Icelandic, a language little changed since the medieval heyday of the Norse Sagas, harpa has traditionally meant harp.
Norse sagas suggested the Vikings discovered the Americas centuries before Columbus, and the latest data seems to support the hypothesis that they may have brought American Indians back with them to northern Europe.