North Germanic


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Wikipedia.
Related to North Germanic: Scandinavian languages

North Germanic

n.
A subdivision of the Germanic languages that includes Norwegian, Icelandic, Swedish, Danish, and Faroese. Also called Norse, Scandinavian.

North Germanic

n
(Languages) a subbranch of the Germanic languages that consists of Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Icelandic, and their associated dialects. See also Old Norse

North′ German′ic


n.
the branch of Germanic that includes Old Norse, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Faeroese, and Icelandic.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.North Germanic - the northern family of Germanic languages that are spoken in Scandinavia and IcelandNorth Germanic - the northern family of Germanic languages that are spoken in Scandinavia and Iceland
Germanic, Germanic language - a branch of the Indo-European family of languages; members that are spoken currently fall into two major groups: Scandinavian and West Germanic
Danish - a Scandinavian language that is the official language of Denmark
Icelandic - a Scandinavian language that is the official language of Iceland
Norwegian - a Scandinavian language that is spoken in Norway
Swedish - a Scandinavian language that is the official language of Sweden and one of two official languages of Finland
Faeroese, Faroese - a Scandinavian language (closely related to Icelandic) that is spoken on the Faroe Islands
References in periodicals archive ?
The Meters of Old Norse Eddic Poetry: Common Germanic Inheritance and North Germanic Innovation
According to popular perception, the Vikings are believed to be seafaring North Germanic people, who raided, traded, explored, and settled in wide areas of Europe, Asia, and the North Atlantic islands from the late 8th to the mid-11th centuries, and wore horned helmets.
Decline of island tongue NORN is an extinct North Germanic language that was spoken in the Northern Isles of Orkney and Shetland and in Caithness, in the far north of the Scottish mainland.
Little vignettes, such as the description of Jamieson's friendship with Grimur Thorkelin, the Icelandic-Danish professor most famous in the English-speaking world for his transcriptions of Beowulf and other Anglo-Saxon poems, as well as helping to explain what is, perhaps, the most unusual feature of the Dictionary's apparatus: the belief that Scots is what we would now term a North Germanic language and therefore not a particularly close relative of English.
The Nordic Languages: An International Handbook of the History of the North Germanic Languages.
In the first major section a useful summary of the Nibelungenlied, arranged following bi-partite division and sequence of aventiure, is followed by an examination of testimony from North Germanic sources.

Full browser ?