Nupe


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Nupe

(ˈnuːpeɪ)
npl -pe or -pes
1. (Peoples) a member of a Negroid people of Nigeria, noted as fishermen, who live near the confluence of the Niger and Benue Rivers
2. (Languages) the language of this people, belonging to the Kwa branch of the Niger-Congo family

NUPE

(ˈnjuːpɪ)
(formerly, in Britain) n acronym for
(Industrial Relations & HR Terms) National Union of Public Employees
References in periodicals archive ?
Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, who worked with Bickerstaffe when both were officials in NUPE, said: "He was a warm, decent and principled man, an outstanding trade unionist and socialist and a great friend and support to me over many years.
Regarding nitrogen application methods higher NUpE was recorded for split doses (0.
Nupe religion: Traditional beliefs and the influence of Islam in a West African chiefdom.
The Edo people call God Osanobwa; the Nupe people call God Soko, while God is called Temearsu or Tamuno among the Ijos.
Jane Kennedy's argument with the Militant Tendency was strictly a NUPE domestic matter and prior to becoming an MP she had never held any office whatsoever within the Labour Party.
Mary Pearson (president of Birmingham Trades Union Council), Paul Mackney (former secretary of Birmingham Trades Union Council), Andy Chaffer (depositor of the Birmingham Anti-Apartheid archive), Jolyon Jones (depositor of the NUPE Social Services/ Birmingham UNISON branch No4 archive), Dave Rogers (Banner Theatre)
Our Labour Government introduced the national minimum wage after a campaign led by Rodney Bickerstaffe and his union NUPE.
The adjacent area probably sagged along a northwest-southeast orientated fracture during this period to ease tensional build-up, resulting in the Nupe depression forming a side basin.
First is the Aale who was described as a Nupe hunter, now Baale Okeelerin, another is the Ohunsile described as an Awori prince now Baale of Ijeru, also is the Orisatolu now Baale isapa, Akandie later Baale Akandie in Isale-Afon who later became extinct.
Out of these 250 ethnic groups, the three major ones comprise of Hausa, Yoruba and Ibo cultures whilst the minor ones include Ijaw, Kanuri, Ibibio, Tiv, Edo and Nupe (CIA World Factbook, 2011).
Intensive missionary and trading activities urbanized the hitherto rustic settlement of Otuocha and further attracted local migrants from neighbouring Igbo communities like Umuoba-Anam and distant Hausa, Nupe and Yoruba groups who eagerly desired land in order to settle and trade in Otuocha.
Just before the frictions triggered by the introduction of Christianity fizzled out, Islam emerged as yet a new religion in the Igbo horizon when the village of Amufie in Enugu Ezike in the old Nsukka Division in northern Igboland adopted a Muslim of Nupe origin known as Ibrahim Aduku.