OED


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OED

abbr.
Oxford English Dictionary

OED

abbreviation for
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) Oxford English Dictionary

OED

or O.E.D.,

Oxford English Dictionary.
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Noun1.OED - an unabridged dictionary constructed on historical principles
References in periodicals archive ?
We've consulted all the above dictionaries except the OED online updates for each word, with these results:
Since 1879, when the dictionary's first editor, James Murray, began publicising lists of words for which additional evidence was especially wanted, the OED has appealed for contributions from the general public.
The OED also noted that the correct name for the "#" symbol
Michael, a former pupil of Fettes College in Edinburgh, said: "When I first joined the OED in 1989, I was part of a small team of five in the new words group.
This article will map the historical roots of the OED, how it came into being, and what its present and future looks like.
OED Online also reveals that if Prince William had proposed to Kate Middleton three hundred years ago, he might have asked her to "join giblets" with him, or suggested that they "buckle", a word used by poet John Dryden in 1693 meaning to unite oneself in wedlock.
Most word mavens, including fans of the OED, have taken to online habits these days, but there's nothing like the serendipitous pleasure of reading the OED - usually with magnifying glass in hand - and happening upon unfamiliar and delightful words.
Mr Portwood said the OED was one of the "long-term research projects we fund, which will never cover their costs but are something that we choose to do.
Once over the initial shock of its scale of information, the OED provides a habit-forming source of wonder and insight.
Both the CD-ROM and online version of the OED allow the user to choose how entries are displayed by turning pronunciations, etymologies, variant spellings, and quotations on and off ("About OED Online").
Figures 4a and 4b show how Tolkien's entry (in his own hand) on 'wain' progressed from dictionary slip to its etymology printed dictionary entry in the first edition (1926) of The OED, which, incidentally, to my eye seemed to be a perfect match for the Online OED version.
They've all been added to the online edition of the OED as part of the ongoing updates to this authoritative reference tool.