obscurement

obscurement

(əbˈskjʊəmənt)
n
a variant form of obscuration
References in periodicals archive ?
If your face piece is dirty, you might as well be fighting a fire with a visual obscurement device on your mask.
Il s'agissait, obscurement, d'un vieil homme qui s'etait fait une specialite, a bon droit, de peindre au lavis des fous rires.
At one point, Muir directly compares glacial markings with God's famous writing on the wall in Daniel, marveling at the fresh revelations he finds in the rock walls of the Sierra: "Much notice has been taken of the writing on the wall of the Persian king's palace, but there is a writing on every wall, and though, like palimpsests, these pages are written line upon line and crossed again and again, none of these old palimpsests is ever wholly obliterated, and no other effacement or obscurement is made save by the writing of other scriptures over those that have gone before" (John of the Mountains 88).
1981; Dery, 1988), 2) obscurement of the first mark as the fish ages (Powell, 1982), 3) deviation from the generalized pattern of opaque and translucent zone formation in temperate fishes (Smith et al.
The outcome of this exploration, in which Djebar introduces her own emotions, feelings, and thoughts far more directly and powerfully than she has ever done before, is that in this society the writer(9) has been singled out as the object of sacrifice of an apparently structural hatred of culture, and, simultaneously, his dead body has been seized as the site par excellence of conflicting social expressions and projects: "Une nation cherchant son ceremonial, sous diverses formes, mais de cimetiere en cimetiere, parce que en premier, l'ecrivain a ete obscurement offert en victime propitiatoire: etrange et desesprrante decouverte
Plus tard, a partir des annees 1930, dans la perspective de la theologie des <<pierres d'attente de la foi>>, le non-chretien trouvera enfin dans le christianisme l'objet inconscient de ses desirs, ce qu'il cherchait obscurement.
Partial or total obscurement of pavement markings by snow or ice presents more of a potential driving hazard to the passing motorist than to the nonpassing motorist.