ob-gyn

(redirected from Obstetrics and gynaecology)
Also found in: Medical, Wikipedia.

ob-gyn

 (ō′bē-jē′wī-ĕn′)
n. Informal
1. The combined practice of obstetrics and gynecology.
2. A specialist in this field; an obstetrician-gynecologist.

ob-gyn

or ob/gyn

(ˈoʊˈbiˈdʒiˌwaɪˈɛn; sometimes ˈɒbˈgaɪn)
1. obstetrics and gynecology.
2. obstetrical-gynecological.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr William Edridge, FCOG (SA), MRCOG (UK), MBBChir (Cantab), a long-time consultant in obstetrics and gynaecology at Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital and lecturer at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, has taken up the editorship of SAJOG.
After moving to Liverpool to work in casualty and play for 'a particular rugby club, he then went to Newcastle to start training in obstetrics and gynaecology, which he was completing at the Royal Free Hospital in London when he came to Johannesburg on a one-year exchange in 1998.
South African Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 2013;19(2):28-29.
SIR Sabaratnam Arulkumaran is head of obstetrics and gynaecology at St George's Hospital in London.
The following day, on March 30, registrar in obstetrics and gynaecology Jyoti Done gave birth to her first child, Nineesha.
In 1975 around 4% of UK medical school graduates, both men and women, stated that obstetrics and gynaecology were their first preference for a career.
Over 140 specialists from 40 countries attended the meeting and discussed the fundamental human right to be trained and to practise obstetrics and gynaecology according to conscience.
A brand new chapter covering ethics in obstetrics and gynaecology makes this fully-updated fourth edition the most comprehensive introduction available.
com/research/744fef/rapid_obstetrics_a) has announced the addition of John Wiley and Sons Ltd's new book "Rapid Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 2nd Edition" to their offering.
com/reports/c54318) has announced the addition of Oxford Handbook of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, First Edition to their offering.
The intellectual property licensed is based on work undertaken by Dr Cristin Print, Dr Steve Charnock-Jones and Dr Nicola Johnson of the Department of Pathology and Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the University of Cambridge, and by Professor Stephen Smith, formerly head of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the University of Cambridge and now Principal of the Faculty of Medicine at Imperial College London.
A second study released in the respected women's health journal, Australia and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, provides evidence of strong acceptance of this method of permanent birth control among women in clinical trials.