dystocia

(redirected from Obstructed labour)
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dystocia

(dɪsˈtəʊʃə)
n
(Gynaecology & Obstetrics) med abnormal, slow, or difficult childbirth, usually because of disordered or ineffective contractions of the uterus
[New Latin, from Greek, from dus- (see dys-) + tokos childbirth + -ia]
dysˈtocial adj
Translations

dys·to·ci·a

n. distocia, parto difícil, laborioso.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Three had hysterectomies following obstructed labour, complicated by postpartum haemorrhage in 2 cases and a ruptured uterus in 1.
She visited Nigeria and Ethiopia to raise awareness of the little-known and tragic condition fistula - obstructed labour during childbirth - which affects millions of women in the third world.
Although this condition is not so much common in the western world, it is highly prevalent in developing countries such as Africa and South East Asia where obstructed labour remains to be the most common cause of this condition till date.
Obstetric fistula is a preventable and treatable childbirth injury that results from prolonged, obstructed labour particularly in poor, rural areas where emergency obstetric care is too distant or simply unavailable.
7%) had obstructed labour due to disproportion; 8 (6.
In Nigeria, the direct causes which are the major implicated factors have been identified to occur in this order of decreasing frequency; obstetric hemorrhage, sepsis (abortion), toxemia of pregnancy, obstructed labour and anemia (4,6).
Currently, however, global statistics indicate that over 80 percent of maternal deaths are directly related to obstetric fistula, haemorrhage, obstructed labour, eclampsia and unsafe abortions.
Based on a review of the literature and consultation with experts, this paper considers clinical technologies addressing the five leading causes of maternal mortality deliberated at Bellagio: post-partum haemorrhage, eclampsia, obstructed labour, puerperal sepsis, and unsafe abortion (pregnancy termination and miscarriage).
This figure will not be a surprise to most midwives, nor will the list of direct causes of death: haemorrhage, infection, eclampsia, obstructed labour and complications from (unsafe) abortion.
Most deaths are from haemorrhage, followed by anaemia, hypertensive disorders, obstructed labour and abortion.
We know that some 80% of the maternal deaths occurring worldwide are still due to obstetric complications such as sepsis, haemorrhage, eclampsia, obstructed labour and complications of abortion.