Odyssey

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Related to Odyssean: Odysseus, odyssey, bewilderment

Od·ys·sey

 (ŏd′ĭ-sē)
n.
The younger of the two surviving ancient Greek epic poems, traditionally ascribed to Homer but containing much orally transmitted material composed over several centuries, and concerning the adventures and ordeals of the Greek warrior Odysseus after the fall of Troy as he struggles to return home and reestablish himself as king of Ithaca.

od′ys·sey′an (-sē′ən) adj.

od·ys·sey

 (ŏd′ĭ-sē)
n. pl. od·ys·seys
1. An extended adventurous voyage or trip.
2. An intellectual or spiritual quest: an odyssey of discovery.

[After the Odyssey.]

Odyssey

(ˈɒdɪsɪ)
n
1. (Poetry) a Greek epic poem, attributed to Homer, describing the ten-year homeward wanderings of Odysseus after the fall of Troy
2. (often not capital) any long eventful journey
Odyssean adj

Od•ys•sey

(ˈɒd ə si)

n., pl. -seys.
1. (italics) an epic poem attributed to Homer, describing Odysseus's adventures in his ten-year attempt to return home to Ithaca after the Trojan War.
2. (often l.c.) any long journey, esp. when filled with adventure, hardships, etc.
Od`ys•se′an, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Odyssey - a long wandering and eventful journeyodyssey - a long wandering and eventful journey
journey, journeying - the act of traveling from one place to another
2.Odyssey - a Greek epic poem (attributed to Homer) describing the journey of Odysseus after the fall of Troy

odyssey

noun journey, tour, trip, passage, quest, trek, expedition, voyage, crusade, excursion, pilgrimage, jaunt, peregrination The march to Travnik was the final stretch of a three-week odyssey.
Translations

Odyssey

[ˈɒdɪsɪ] N (Myth) → Odisea f
odyssey (fig) → odisea f

odyssey

[ˈɒdɪsi] nodyssée f

Odyssey

n (Myth, fig) → Odyssee f

odyssey

[ˈɒdɪsɪ] nodissea
References in classic literature ?
When I rode across the Troad from the Dardanelles to Hissarlik and Mount Ida, I noticed that my dragoman and his men did all our outdoor cooking exactly in the Odyssean and Iliadic fashion.
Greek] of the Odyssean passage was due to the [Greek] of the "Iliad.
The Odyssean [Greek] were the sheds that ran round the yard as the arches do now.
It was probably the only one known in the Odyssean age.
Not so the writer of the "Iliad" from which the Odyssean passage is probably taken.
277) about the "amber route" and the "Sacred Way" in this connection; but until he gives his grounds for holding that the Mediterranean peoples in the Odyssean age used to go far North for their amber instead of getting it in Sicily, where it is still found in considerable quantities, I do not know what weight I ought to attach to his opinion.
The famous dactylism, therefore, of the Odyssean line was probably suggested by that of the Ileadic rather than by a desire to accommodate sound to sense.
116} Doubtless the road would pass the harbour in Odyssean times as it passes the salt works now; indeed, if there is to be a road at all there is no other level ground which it could take.
The legend is evidently a Christianised version of the Odyssean story, while the name supplies the additional detail that the disaster happened in consequence of an evil counsel.
134} The names Syra and Ortygia, on which island a great part of the Doric Syracuse was originally built, suggest that even in Odyssean times there was a prehistoric Syracuse, the existence of which was known to the writer of the poem.
These include long-run Delphic forward guidance and any Odyssean forward guidance.
Castaway narratives stir up archetypal Biblical and Odyssean themes of homelessness and return, but it is important to recognize the newness and modernity of these stories.