Office of the Dead


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Office of the Dead

n. Ecclesiastical
An office traditionally sung or said before a burial mass in the Roman Catholic Church, now obligatory only on All Souls' Day.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Office of the Dead - an office read or sung before a burial mass in the Roman Catholic Church
office - a religious rite or service prescribed by ecclesiastical authorities; "the offices of the mass"
Church of Rome, Roman Catholic Church, Roman Church, Western Church, Roman Catholic - the Christian Church based in the Vatican and presided over by a pope and an episcopal hierarchy
References in classic literature ?
The office of the dead being celebrated, the last adieux paid to the noble departed, the assembly dispersed, talking, along the roads, of the virtues and mild death of the father, of the hopes the son had given, and of his melancholy end upon the arid coast of Africa.
Still another kind of Christian interpretation of Job can be seen in the heartbreaking passages quoted in the Catholic Office of the Dead (sadly excised by Vatican II), where Job's desperate voice speaks for the person being buried.
border--Section: Office of the Dead, Vespers --Script: littera
Still, he strongly urged them not to avail themselves of this remission (20) and attached indulgences of 100 days for praying the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary and Office of the Dead and 50 days for the Gradual and Penitential psalms.
Refusing to allow Philip to be buried, Juana traveled with his coffin until at least August 1507; she retained Philip's chapel to sing the Office of the Dead daily.
One becomes lost in time through the grave character of the work, taken at a pace that respects an Office of the Dead.
The discussion of genres thus leads to Mufti's identification of local polyphonic tradition, especially in the Holy Week items, the Office of the Dead, and Vespers psalms.
Two of these chants are part of the office of the dead in the same manuscript, while the other two are more specific to this service.
For example, at the opening of the Office of the Dead in the Wharncliffe Hours (MS Felton 1072-3, National Gallery of Victoria), the central illustration is taken from the popular legend of the Three Living and the Three Dead, while the border is filled with a graveyard scene, showing gravediggers, beggars and mourners, some of whom are suspended among bare tree branches on an almost surrealist circle of turf.
The ninth circle contains a picture of a draped coffin, and behind it a clerk presumably reading the office of the dead.
It brings back, too, the first word of the first antiphon in the Office of the Dead.
It is a Commentary on the Seven Penitential Psalms which formed part of the office of the dead, or burial service, during the Middle Ages.

Full browser ?